Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Big Muskie (Bucyrus-Erie 4250-W) Dragline Crane

I've accumulated enough photos of Big Muskie that it is time for its own set of notes.
Caterpillar
In 1966, an exciting project started at the factories of the Bucyrus Erie Co. – the engineering and building of the components of what would be one of the world’s largest earthmoving machines ever built, “Big Muskie.” Central Ohio Coal Co. had chosen this immense machine because the mine property extended over 110,000 acres of hilly terrain and made the use of a dragline versus a shovel to be more profitable at the levels of earth the coal was located in. It also allowed the coal company to better carryout their reclamation plans.
The machine was so large it was necessary to ship the components to the coal mining customer in Ohio and erect the machine on site. It took 340 rail cars and 260 trucks to ship all of the components and 200,000 man hours to construct, but the machine finally went into production in 1969.
Weighing in at over 27,000,000 pounds, it stood nearly 22 stories high and had a 330-foot twin boom and a 220-cubic yard bucket the size of a 12-car garage.
In 1976, “Big Muskie” removed 8,000 yards of overburden for the coal company per operating hour. In its 22 years of service, it removed twice the amount of earth moved during the original construction of the Panama Canal.
Shut down in 1991, “Big Muskie” was finally dismantled for scrap in 1999. The only component saved was the bucket, which was later incorporated into a display about the machine and surface mining and reclamation in Miners Memorial Park in McConnelsville, Ohio. 

It was electrically powered with 13,800 volts. [tractors]
AmericanMineServices
The electricity cost tens of thousands of dollar an hour, and explains why the crew of five usually worked at night when power costs were cheaper.
[The video below says it stopped only for 30-min lunch breaks, maintenance, and Christmas Day.]

Modern Draglines
Giant draglines have long since been made obsolete, but dragline excavators are still very much in use. The largest available dragline on the market today is Joy Global’s P&H 9020XPC. The bucket has a capacity of (110yd³ to 160yd³.) Unlike the hydraulic engines and motors of years past, current draglines use digital AC controls.


Bastard rails roads air & water posted
moving [the tub of] BIG MUSKIE using 9 earth scrappers in the front
Manufacturer: Bucyrus-Erie
Weight: 27,000,000 pounds
Height: 222 feet 6 inches
Machine length (boom down):487 feet 6 inches
Mobility: Hydraulically driven walker feet
Eamon Ault I googled more, they're scooting the tub out from beneath it.
Mike Hutchins Dave Hickcox They had more than 1 bucket as they needed hardfacing and other repairs on a rotational basis.

Bastard rails roads air & water posted
moving the parts of BIG MUSKIE took a violent amount of brutal pulling and pushing power
David Lane In dragline terms, that is the 'tub', the base that the dragline sat and rotated on. The Muskie was the largest dragline ever built(if I remember correctly) Saw these pics many years ago on the old STRIPMINE.ORG. I grew up just northeast of her.

Scott Simcok shared
James Peeler Them 41-B Allis Chalmers were a brute of a machine!!
Eric S Manners I read when they rebuilt the tub, they used 30,000 lbs of welding rods!
Joseph Bonola 2 weeks work just greasing the roller path.

Chris Knoxhill commented on a post
M U S K I E

Jim Seese posted
Visited this last spring in Ohio. Bucket from Big Musky.
Jim Seese  McConnelsville , Ohio
James Butch Rainey Hard to imagine 220 cubic yards! Amazing every time I see it.
Mike Mccarley James Butch Rainey. I look back at my pictures of the Marion 8200's that I worked on in the 80's. And i thought an 85 yard bucket was big. Damn!
Ray Little commented on Jim's post
Here’s our car next to the bucket on Christmas Day of ‘98.

Paul Martin posted
Here is a photo of the 4250-W Big Muskie during erection.

Paul Martin commented on his post
front view 4250W

William Oldani commented on Paul's post

Paul Martin commented on his post
great bucket pic

This Facebook info is near the end of the notes so that hopefully the sidebar is empty and the "Original Size" images are readable.
Daniel Foged posted eight images with the comment: "Here some facts about big muskie."

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[B-E's South Milwaukee Plant]

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Daniel Foged posted
6x D9 is pulling the bucket for big muskie.
Dennis Bertoncelj The bottom of that bucket gets hot.Matty Carey Dennis Bertoncelj try dragging it through rock with 12,000 horsepower 3 or 4 hundred thousand times.
They get a lot hotter. [The video below says it had up to 52,500hp.]Dennis Bertoncelj Matty Carey yeah ive burnsd my hand on a tooth or two.Dennis Bertoncelj Matty Carey the tub gets pretty hot on a long deadhead too

(new window)  Big Muskie (and the captain): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcmGKsHZXZ8
   implosion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKcKn-cQSRM
Troy Bratcher posted: in action video 5:00,  three photos (photo of pulling out the tub with six earth movers in a comment),  video of inside the house (William Law If I remember right ten swing motors, ten drag motors and eight hoist motors, 1,200 hp each., Jay Wilson Six inch floor under the drag drum, was wrinkled from the power. Stout machine.)



A "Big Muskie - 4250-W Bucyru-Erie" Album with 22 photos and the comment:
The Big Muskie was a model 4250-W Bucyrus-Erie dragline (the only one ever built). With a 220 cubic yards (170 m3) bucket, it was the largest single-bucket digging machine ever created and one of the world's largest mobile earth-moving machines alongside the Illinois-based Marion 6360 stripping shovel called The Captain and the German bucket wheel excavators of the Bagger 288 and Bagger 293 family.[1] It cost $25 million in 1969, the equivalent of $157 million today adjusted for inflation.[2] Its bucket could hold two Greyhound buses side by side. It took over 200,000 man hours to construct over a period of about two years
A share of the Muskie album has some interesting comments including:
Robert Bann Machine was too big, too much down time, to much maintenance. COCC realized that 2 machines designed in the 120 yard range would have out preformed the Big Muskie.
David Kam Hudder Amazing engineering
Robert Bann David Kam Hudder 6 years planning.


Monday, March 30, 2020

RTA Wilson Avenue Tower and Yard

(HAERSatellite, the yard was on the east side of the tracks between Wilson and Montrose)

The yard burned down in 1996 after RTA had moved maintenance and storage in 1993 to a new Howard yard and shop. It has now been redeveloped. The Howard expansion was part of the plan for switching the south end of the Red Line from Englewood-Jackson Park to Dan Ryan. [chicago-L]

HAER ILL,16-CHIG,107A--1
1. VIEW OF WILSON AVENUE UPPER LEVEL INTERLOCKING TOWER. DESIGN SIMILAR TO THAT WHICH WAS ON LOOP.

HAER ILL,16-CHIG,107A--2
2. GENERAL VIEW IN SWITCH ROOM OF TOWER SHOWING MECHANICAL INTERLOCKING LEVERS.

HAER ILL,16-CHIG,107A--3
3. VIEW OF LOCKING BED AND LEADOUT CRANKS ON FIRST FLOOR OF TOWER.

HAER ILL,16-CHIG,107A--4
4. VIEW OF MECHANICAL INTERLOCKING LEADOUT FROM TOWER.

1938 Aerial Photo from ILHAP

(new window)




Milwaukee transferred the Chicago & Evanston route north of Wilson to the CTA with the understanding that the CTA would serve the few remaining industries along the track, mostly coal retailers. Milwaukee handed off freight cars to the CTA at Wilson. For an extensive history and description of this freight operation, see L-freight.

Sam Carlson posted
Lou Gerard Wow! At Wilson Yard!
Ralcon Wagner Terrific! The freight loco used to move loads of coal between Milwaukee Road branch and CTA el line at Montrose/Wilson connecting track in Chicago. This image was made between 1960 and 1973. Looks like the loco was freshly painted. Great find!
Lou Gerard According to the info on the back of the print, it is from 1961.

David Daruszka commented on Matt's post
The line was originally built as a commuter line that ran as far north as Wilmette. Commuter service was abandoned in the early 1900's and the Northwestern Elevated assumed operations over the right of way north of Wilson Ave. That line was later elevated. There was a freight exchange yard at Wilson with the CTA, who provided freight service for the remaining businesses that needed it. Slowly but surely freight service south of Wilson diminished as well.
["During the last month of freight service, locomotive S-104 is pushing two empty hopper cars back to Buena Yard on the freight lead in April 1973. The freight train has just passed over Montrose Avenue and is heading north on the elevated connection between Buena Yard and Track 1 at Wilson station, seen looking southwest from the Wilson Shops lunchroom. (Photo by Lou Gerard)" [L-freight]]

Craig Holmberg commented on a post
Joshua Sutherland Lakewood line from the 1870's to 1973, used to switch cars to the CTA for the CTA's freight service that ended in 1973 when Lill coal yard stopped receiving shipments.
Joshua Sutherland Craig Holmberg We have one of those (CTA S104) at the Museum in Union.
[Comments implied there were two of these electric freight locomotives to serve industries on the CTA part because they were named Delores and LaVerne.
"On the last day of CTA freight service, locomotive S-104 is seen shoving the last empty hoppers south down Track 1 back to Buena Yard, passing Berwyn station on April 30, 1973. This would be the last in-service freight run on the "L". (Photo by Lou Gerard)" [L-freight]]
Due to their substantial weight -- about 100,000 pounds -- electric locomotive S-104 and its twin, S-105, were well-suited to snow clearance duty during the winter months when not needed for freight service. Here, S-104 is seen in Lower Wilson Yard with a snowplow attached to its front on February 1, 1939. The four-track North Side Main Line and the elevated Wilson Shops are visible in the background. (Photo by George Krambles, from the Krambles-Peterson Archive) [L-freight]



Jon Roma Flickr album of ten photos of the tower and interlocking  Of note is the photo of the upper level of the yard and shops. There is a yard and shops on the ground level as well.

There are some interesting comments on Marty's post and share.





Sunday, March 29, 2020

CSX/L&N Trestle over Red River in the wilderness of KY

(Bridge HunterSatellite)

When I was looking at Google Maps, I was surprised how far I had to zoom out to find a town to find the county this bridge was in. (Bridge Hunter and Historic Bridges index their information by county.) That's why I went with "in the wilderness" in the title.

I was going to quit doing yet-another-trestle. But then I came across these drone shots of the transfer of the C&O 2716 from New Haven to Ravenna, KY. Since I have Terry's permission to use his photos in this blog, I couldn't resist looking for this trestle. As the Bridge Hunter and Satellite links indicate, I did find it.
Redeker Rail Video & Photography posted

Redeker Rail Video & Photography posted

Redeker Rail Video & Photography posted

Bridge Hunter, Fair Use
I don't see photos of trestles very often with a good paint job.
1956 L&N Photo, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA), via Bridge Hunter & American-Rails

Photo from Kentucky Steam Heritage, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA)

Saturday, March 28, 2020

USACE had two 60' ringer cranes

I've already described the Hercules crane that the US Army Corps of Engineers own. I've recently learned that the USACE had a second 60' ringer on a barge to help them build the Olmsted Dam. I learned about the second one because they sold it last December for almost $1 million since the dam is now finally finished.
safe_image for PLATFORM RINGER CRANE
John Taylor That would be a bargain if you needed a stationary heavy lift crane, what a beast.
Walter Miller It's a nice machine we picked some power house parts. 800.000 didn't know it had it.
Hunter Strittmatter Went to someone in Pittsburgh.
The GSA auction site had the following twelve photos.
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Tomas Coi commented on Ben's share

Tomas Coi commented on Ben's share
Ben Stalvey Must be on a mega barge.
Tomas Coi Was on 200 by 100


Matt Mohd Ji posted three photos with the comment: "Sweet blue 60ft plateform ringer."
Dan O'Neal Olmsted Locks and Dam ,Olmsted, Ill.
[There are several comments about how do they make the barge stable? They seem to contradict each other. So I still don't know the answer. But however they stabilize it, that is important and explains why the USACE wanted to sell just the crane and keep the barge.]
Dan O'Neal Ben Stalvey they are taking it off the barge and selling it, putting a 16000 in its place.

Dan O'Neal Manitowoc 60' platform ringer 1 of 6.
Ben Stalvey True wish i could find the other 5 60ft platform ringers.
Dan O'Neal Ben Stalvey didn't the Corps of Engineers own 2.
Ben Stalvey Dan O'Neal Yes you are correct believe one is called Hercules
Dennis DeBruler Ben Stalvey So this ringer must be the one the USACE sold last December for almost $1 million, but they still have Hercules. The auction link you shared has 16 photos of this crane.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Manitowoccraneenthusiasts/permalink/2817919861625579/
Ben Stalvey Dennis DeBruler correct.

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Ben Stalvey commented on Matt's post