Sunday, January 31, 2016

Atlanta & West Point Bridge over Chattahoochee River

Satellite
Terrence's comment:
CSX Atlanta & West Point Route (A&WP Subdivision), West Point, GA.134 car long CSX Q619-28 (Hamlet, NC - New Orleans, LA Manifest) crosses the Chattahoochee River Bridge with CSX Yn2 AC4400CW 289 & CSX Yn2 ES44AC 759.
VIDEO 

Terrence Ellison Jr. shared his video

ComEd Substation Building

ComEd used to house substation equipment like transformers in buildings.

Street View North End

Street View South End
Actually, the equipment in the replacement substation across the street is more covered than what I see in the suburbs.

Street View South
Ed Lozanski posted
I learned of this building from a Facebook posting. Notice the "electric light" detail that was included between each window arch.

20151212 7455
In the yuppified northside, they at least build pretty fences. (On Goose Island.)
LoopNet
The ComEd building is now called the Gaitan Building, and it was built in 1925 and has the following real-estate description:
150,000 sf Industrial bldg, all concrete and brick construction, 3 stories, full basement, drive in doors, loading dock, 2 side yards, alley, central location to Chicago skyway and Dan Ryan expressways, 5 blocks to University of Chicago Campus, needs total rehab, short window of availability, no inspections or reports, buy as is! a deal at twice the price!!! (LoopNet)
That web page also mentioned that it has a clear ceiling height of 35 feet. So it sounds like it is really has one very high story. That is, the building is hallow inside. That makes sense for substation use. And many erecting shops are like that with a travelling crane overhead.

ComEd doesn't bother to hide all of their urban substations. The people of the River City Condominiums are "treated" to a regular ugly view of the Taylor Street Substation.

Below are pictures of the substation close to me so you can see how normally open they are.

20140601 0019, north side

south side
This substation is not near public roads. But on may way home I passed one that was near roads and none of that equipment was covered either. I remember that I stopped to take pictures, but I can't find them. However, it is big enough that a satellite image is probably a better view anyhow.

Satellite




Excavators and Big Haul Trucks

I have already posted some pictures of excavators as examples of the use of hydraulic rams. I've been saving pictures/videos of big excavators, and some associated mining equipment, as I come across them. I plan to add to this post as I come across other "neat" pictures.

Awesome Earthmovers Video of mining equipment being moved into and demonstrated ast a convention center.
John W. Coke posted
Edward Duke Interesting front tires on it...


John W. Coke posted, cropped
The moves of mining equipment below would be from a played out mine to a nearby new mine. The equipment is originally built from parts shipped in quite a few railcars or 18-wheelers. When I took a tour in Caterpillars visitor center in Peoria, IL, the guide mentioned the number of railcars needed to ship the parts for a big haul truck, but of course I can no longer remember what that number was.

20150904,07 4466
But first, at the small (old) end of the scale was a dragline and a crane with a clamshell attachment putting on a demonstration at the SCRAP annual Labor Day antique tractor show. A video of a Type 8 Erie steam shovel in action. The dump truck is an antique also.

Anders Eriksson posted two photos of an Akerman 751. His comment provides a time frame for when hydraulic power replaced cable power: "A one yard, 25 tonne machine of late sixties vintage. The very last traditional ropeshovel made by Åkerman."

1942 British video. They burn iron ore on top of piles of burning coal.

Cody Wangen posted three photos of a 1955 Bucyrus Erie 15-B that he wants to learn how to run.

Wayne Helms -> Railroad Maintenance of Way Photo's 
This is the first time I have seen rails put on a flatcar so that the excavator can roll back and forth. This allows it to clear a section of track before the train has to be moved again.
Glenn Miller posted
Glen's comment:
Osgood Steam Shovel at work on the Chicago main drainage channel. Just some of the machinery used and methods of work adopted in excavating the 28-mile drainage canal from Chicago to Lockport. What they learned here, they used digging the Panama Canal.
The "drainage channel" the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. It reversed the flow of  the Chicago River so that Chicago people did not have to drink their own sewage. (Instead, Illinois River towns could drink it.) This not only was the state-of-art in the late 1900s, it pushed the state-of-art.

Donald Worrell posted, 1926
John Nowakowski posted
John's comment:
The dredging of the Chicago River, in the process of reversing it's flow, 1899. (from "The Lost Panoramas)
Allison Hirsch Fore This is a glass plate negative by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago that was used with permission in the book. The description for this photo is: Three men pose on a dipper dredge bucket on October 16, 1899, during construction of a bypass channel on the South Branch between Van Buren St. and Adams St. The bypass channel was built to widen and deepen the river so that it could convey the required flow for the soon-to-open Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal.

George Kalogeras I do believe some of the concrete frame work is still in the river south of Van Buren.



Byron Smith posted
Byron's comment:
Here is a pic of JENNY she is a old Bucyrus that operated at Iron Knob South Australia.
The old girl was introduced in the mid 30s an ran for 38 years before being placed on top of the Iron Monarch lookout as a souvenir o the mining past. The old girl pulled just shy of a million tonnes per year.
A few years ago she was bought back down s a cutback could be done and then returned to its rightful place at the top of the hill.

A video of a cable shovel in action from Dave Majlinger.


See below for modern, big excavators.

John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
Note that the dump bed was removed for this move by two trucks. Imagine how carefully the drivers have to coordinate their driving. Later, I found a picture of dump beds being moved. (Update: a video of dual truck driving.)

John W. Coke -> R&HHL
The above move must have been for a very shot distance. I assume that they normally do more disassembly so that they can be hauled by several singleton trucks.

John W. Coke -> R&HHL
John W. Coke -> R&HHL

Rich Reinhart -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
Rich Reinhart -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads



Mammoet Canada
And some movements don't require any disassembly.




A video of moving a front loader. Note that it is a big move even though the cab, bucket, and tires have been removed. Another video of a front loader being moved. At 0:07 you can clearly see that the wheels under the trailer turn more the further away they are from the back of the trailer.
Jason Jordan shared
[The bigger they are, the harder they fall.]

The big dump trucks have tires about twice as tall as a person. And I noticed the big front loaders had some pretty big tires. I always wondered who made those tires --- Firestone, Goodyear, Bridgstone, etc. I learned from a train video's comments that Cat evidently makes them in their own plant in Peoria, IL.

Ashok Kumar posted
[In Netherland they took a big haul through a town. Actually, it is a big haul design, but it is not very big. Note that there are not very many steps needed to get to the cab, and the cab is big compared to the rest of the truck.]
Engineering World: "The Biggest Truck in the World..."
The Komatsu 960E is an off-highway, ultra-class, rigid-frame, two-axle, diesel/AC electric powertrain haul truck designed and manufactured by Komatsu America Corp. in Peoria, Illinois, United States.
The 960E is Komatsu’s largest, highest capacity haul truck, offering a payload capacity of up to 327 tons. The truck is powered by a four cycle diesel engine with 18 V-type cylinders. The power output of the engine is 3,500HP.


This now claims the be the largest in the world:


Did the stick of the shovel accidentally fall down on the end of the dump bed?
Jay Wilson shared


These moves of mining equipment would be from a played out mine to a nearby new mine. The equipment is originally built from parts shipped in quite a few railcars or 18-wheelers. When I took a tour in Caterpillars visitor center in Peoria, IL, the guide mentioned the number of railcars needed to ship the parts for a big haul truck, but of course I can no longer remember what that number was.

John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
There appears to be a part of the boom laid crosswise in front ob the background track. Note that there looks like there is a boom laid crosswise in front of the background track. This view of a P&H shows that they have a boom that olds the bucket. But if you look above the left side of the cab, you can see that that boom is still attached to this unit. Maybe they are carrying a boom for another unit that is also being moved.

Dan Mackey has a Flickr Album that shows a shovel being disassembled into parts that will fit on railroad flatcars. Note that some of the flat cars have 3-axle, instead of the usual 2-axle, trucks to carry a heavier than normal load. And the turret's depressed well has a bolster at each end so that the load is spread over two trucks so the car has a total of 8 axles.

John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
I was surprised by the number of hydraulic hoses going between the cab and the boom. The the following photo provided part of the answer. These big units use two hydraulic rams for each degree-of-movement.


John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
The depressed well increases the vertical clearance to carry exceptionally high loads. I didn't note any parts that look like the bucket. I wonder how that was moved.

Even just the boom of one of this cranes is a big load.
John W. Coke -> R&HHL
I noticed that the trailer seems to be bending. As Eric Allen commented: "No need for axles that don't even touch the ground!"
John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads


John W. Coke -> Rail & Highway Heavy Loads
John W. Coke posted
Jason Jordan shared
Liebherr R9800. The largest excavator in the World.
[Actualy, it is just the third largest.]
A video of a EX5500 being hauled intact except for its bucket. I recomment skipping to about 0:50 into the video.

John W. Coke posted
[If you take off the boom, you can haul a rather big one with just one truck and a special trailer.]

John W. Coke posted
Screenshot from a video
With lots of horsepower comes lots of responsibility. What really blew my mind is that once the truck was torn apart, the trailer rolled further to the left into the bog. What did they hook the chain to --- the radiator instead of the truck frame?

A video of a big excavator and several heavy haul trucks moving dirt. At the end it shows "Liebherr Mining Power." I was worried that Cat has bought enough companies (e.g. Bucyrus-Erie, Marion) that they have a monopoly. They probably do have a monopoly in America, but at least there is global competition.

Top 10 earth moving machines (Caution: it looks like a risky site.)

Bucyrus RH400

The biggest hydraulic excavator in the world, the Bucyrus RH400 is a front-shovel excavator weighing approximately 889 tons. Its shovel can hold 45 cubic meter of earth in a single scoop. The RH400 is the inspiration behind Decepticon Demolishor in the 2009 movie “Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen.”
Screenshot (source)
Komatsu PC 8000 assembled in 1.5 minutes


Since the bucket is removed, I don't know if this is an excavator or a shovel.

A Feb. 5, 2016 video whose title claims the Hatachi EX8000 is the largest in the world. The comments indicate that, once again, it is hard to claim the world's largest of anything.

(new window) It uses two Cummins engines.


Look at the end of this article for pictures of both big shovels and Cat 979s mining oil sands.

108.920 HP Diesel Engine: Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C Turbocharcharged Two-Sroke

For more information:  Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C
Jason Jordan shared  Mining & Construction Equipment'sphoto.
Jason: "How about this turbocharger??"
Mining: "
Turbo off a 109,000hp engine"

Steve McCollum commented on above posting
The only 100K HP engine I know about is this Warzila-Sulzer. I like the ladder rungs inside the crank case!

Steve McCollum commented on above postingAnd here's the full Monte view.


Saturday, January 30, 2016

MoW: Side Booms

Midwest Railroad Photography posted
Their comment:
BNSF Derailment
BNSF 6387 leans badly after running through the derail at ISU on the BNSF Ottumwa Subdivision. Here are a few shots of Amtrak #6 passing the site, as well as Hulcher at work. Chillicothe, IA 1/28/2016. -Justin   HiDef(Flickr)

This Flickr image is the beginning of a sequence of pictures showing Hulcher cleaning up a derailing. A side boom is a bulldozer body that has a boom on one side and a counterweight on the other. They were developed for laying pipeline, but I have noticed that most train-wreck contractors now use them instead of more traditional cranes.

Mark Harvey The power plant crew ran the empty train through a split point derail. Derail did its job, all six axles of the lead were on the ground, the second was about 12" from the end of the rail. Got lucky on that one.

A locomotive does not hit the split point derail unless the train passed a signal that should have been displaying absolute stop. The derail is controlled by the interlocking plant along with the signals and turnouts. It did its job of keeping an effectively run-a-way train from fouling the mainline. Some comments explained Amtrak was on the close track because the other main was blocked by another coal train.

Midwest Railroad Photography posted (Flickr)
This picture from the above collection is of particular interest because you can see the counterweight on the unit on the left that has no load is straight up. But the counterweight of the unit on the right that is lifting a load is extended to compensate for the weight of the load.

Bill DeMar posted
Update: Bill's comments:
The drop table at Amtrak's 16th Street diesel shop Chicago was down for repairs, so track 11 is the temp table. P -42 #199 is having a traction motor change out.
Chicago has a 40 ton overhead crane , enough to change out a prime mover. A P-42's weight is about 284,284 pounds, to much for the overhead.

14-18-foot Sewer Pipe being built in 1918

Raymond Kunst posted
Laying sewer pipes along Lawrence Ave, 1918, Chicago
I wonder if the trestle pilings we see on the side of the trench were driven all along both sides. Specifically, is that what is keeping the mud walls with buildings on top of them from collapsing? They have a conveyor belt that carries debris from the dig in front of the pipe back to fill over the pipe that is built. This method of laying pipe is called "cut and fill." That conveyor is on rails so that it can be moved forward as the dig progresses.

The comments indicate the scaffolding in the middle is to allow workers to construct a brick arch for the top of the pipe.

Michael Pazanin Looks like there lined with Brick , at that time there where more bricklayers then all the other trades tougher!!!

No wonder I keep finding brick plants in various towns. Illinois is lucky that it sits on top of sedimentary rock that has a lot of  outcroppings of coal, sand and clay.

Fernando Flores A few years ago, I saw them working on this tunnel at Lawrence between Linder and Cicero, and you could see the bricks layout clearly. It was fascinating!