Friday, November 30, 2018

St. Charles Air Line Bridge Before Elevation

There are a lot of photos of the current Strauss trunnion-heel bridge. Photos of the swingbridge that existed before the tracks were elevated and the river was straightened are rare enough that they deserve there own posting rather than getting lost in the existing posting.

The last photo from eight photos of elevating the tracks northeast of here is worth copying.

Paul Petraitis posted
11am 9/23/1905, Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District
Ean Kahn-Treras We are looking off of 18th Street in this view. The elevated track is the IC iowa division curving for their crossing of the RI at 16th Street.
Mark E. Vaughan Wasn’t the Erie carfloat interchange operation in this area also?
Bob Lalich The Erie Lake Line had two stations, both of which were farther north. Information describing the operations can be found here: http://freepages.rootsweb.com/.../genealogy/erielakechi.html

Bob Lalich commented on Paul's posting
The bridge seen here is the SCAL swing bridge. The yard here is C&WI's 18th St Yard. 16th St Tower can be seen in the distance. Here is the smoke abatement map of the area.

1897 Map
Paul's posting is also one of the better views I have seen of Burlington's grain elevators that were next to some slips off the South Branch.

James Boudreaux posted
Elevating the St. Charles Airline from Chicago Union Stations' south main line. Bottom L/S quadrant is now Amtraks' 16th St. diesel shop and yard (ex Penn Central, Pennsylvania RR). Upper R/S quadrant is Metras' yard (ex CB&Qs' Zephyr Pit)

David Daruszka also posted
St. Charles Airline track elevation under construction.
Bob Lalich That is a beer bottle from the Schoenhofen brewery. http://forgottenchicago.com/articles/schoenhofen-brewery/

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Cleveland's "High Road" Bridges (Superior and Detroit-Superior)

1878  Superior Viaduct:
   (Bridge Hunter; ClevelandHistoricalSatellite, note that the streetcar tracks still exist in part of it)
1917+1965+1997  Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge:
   (Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges; HAER; 3D Satellite, 174+ photos)

These notes are labelled "bridgeTrestle" because these bridges are considered viaducts. I use "bridgeTrestle" for both trestles and viaducts because I've seen too many different explanations about the difference between a trestle and a viaduct.

Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
A view of the viaduct shortly after it opened in 1878.
The following photo raised the question of why does a stone viaduct just end? The short answer is that the swing span was removed after the Superior Viaduct was replaced by the Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge. As you can image, the rest of this page is the long answer.
Robert Pempsell posted
The first high-level bridge across the Cuyahoga Valley was started in March 1875 and opened in Dec. 1878. Because it had a swing span, road traffic would still be stopped by some river traffic. But there would be far fewer stoppages than suffered by the low-level bridges. Plus it saved braking your buggy or wagon while going down into the valley and then the horse having to pull it back out of the valley on the other side. [ClevelandHistorical]
Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
In this photograph from 1912, the center span of the Superior Viaduct has opened to a let a ship pass underneath.
[Note the abundance of streetcars and the scarcity of cars in 1912. I found one car and a couple of trucks.]

Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of the Library of Congress
The swinging, center span of the Superior Avenue Viaduct, circa 1900.
I repeat the above photo because Francis found a better exposure.
Francis Otterbein posted
Swing Bridge Cleveland circa 1910. Superior Avenue viaduct over the Cuyahoga River.

Mike Brady commented on Francis' posting
Started construction 1875, opened 1878 for traffic and removed in 1923 due to a new bridge. I love this photo of it being built.

Mike Brady posted
Cleveland Ohio, worth sharing such a good photo, a really good one. Wow !https://clevelandhistorical.org/index.php/items/show/512…
[Where was the Central Viaduct built? https://clevelandhistorical.org/index.php/items/show/512]

Shorpy
Gavin EspositoGavin and 279 others joined RAILROAD BRIDGES, TRESTLES, TUNNELS AND CUTS within the last two weeks. Give them a warm welcome into your community! Surprisingly enough, this bridge was the site of the worse traction railroad accident in American history. On November 16th, 1895, car #642 driven by motorman Augustus Rogers plunged into the Cuyahoga River below when the draw was mistakenly left open. Safety mechanisms were in place to prevent such accidents, a derailer switch was in place on both sides of the draw spaced 100 feet apart, the motorman would have to get out, throw the switch, and climb back on to proceed. Beyond this was a pair of gates that he also had to open, but were driven electronically once the car had passed. The power source failed that evening, resulting in the gates never closing. As car #642 approaches the draw with 25 passengers aboard, motorman Rogers motioned for conductor Edward Hoffman to get off and throw the switch; he obliged and did so. Picking Hoffmann back up the car rolled towards—and then through the gates. Falling some 101 feet into the Cuyahoga River below, it struck an abutment of the bridge and bounced into the Cuyahoga River—killing 17 of the 25 passengers

In 1917 a higher level bridge was built so that no river traffic would impact the traffic on the bridge. The approaches are reinforced concrete arches and the 590' main span over the river is, obviously, a steel arch. The upper level was designed for four lanes of traffic and the lower level held six streetcar tracks. The streetcar deck was abandoned in 1955. The swing span was removed from the Superior Viaduct in 1923.
Photo from HAER OHIO,18-CLEV,22--28 (CT) from oh0124
The 1917 bridge was designed by  J. A. L. Waddell. I recognize him as the pioneer of the lift bridge design starting with the 1894 Halsted Bridge in Chicago, IL. He also did pioneering work with reinforced concrete bridges in the 1915 12th Street Trafficway Viaduct in Kansas City, MO. And the 591' nickel-steel arch of this bridge shows he added steel arches to his design repertoire. [ahr-kc]

This "hold Ctrl and move the mouse" Google View shows that several of the old stone arches still exist on the western side. It also shows the bridge that replaced it in the background.
Google Maps
It is interesting that the smaller arches under the upper deck of the eastern approach of the 1917 bridge don't appear in the above view. I captured this street view to confirm that the missing inter-deck arches are because I was pushing Google's 3D algorithm really hard to get a view of the stone arches.
Street View
Some of the arches of the 1878 bridge were removed in 1938.
Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
An arch is soon to be torn down in this 1938 photograph. Several of the viaduct's arches still stand on the west side of the river.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

BNSF/NP 1911+1928 Bridges over Duwamish River in Seattle, WA

(1911 Bridge Hunter1928 Bridge Hunter, 3D Satellite)

While looking at a satellite map for the BNSF/GN bridge over the Lake Washington Ship Canal, I spotted this bridge on the satellite map. And then within 24 hours I saw this posting.

Guy Prior posted the comment:
Hello fellow bridge and tunnel admirers I have just acquired the Walthers bascule bridge. Reading the blurb it stated that this model is based on the real thing crossing the Duwamish river in Seattle Washington. Apparently it is still in use by BNSF and I was wondering if anyone had a photo of a bascule bridge crossing the Duwamish they could share?🤔🤔. I want to maybe give it that look, anything will help. Cheers🤓


Nicholas Boyd commented on Guy's posting
The Bridge Hunter pages for this bridge taught me that Strauss' early designs put the lift machinery on the end of the top cord of the movable span and his later designs moved the machinery to the stationary counterweight tower. The Strauss bridge in Ashtabula, OH, is an example of an early design that never got converted to the later design. This bridge was converted in 1928. Judging from the platform still remaining at the end of the top cord of the span on the close by Salmon Bay Bridge, I presume it is another converted bridge.




Tuesday, November 27, 2018

WLE/B&O 1905 Benwood Bridge over the Ohio River at Bellaire, OH

(Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges; HAER; see below for satellite)

WLE = Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway

Evidently it is called Benwood instead of Bellaire because B&O had their yard on the Benwood, WV side. Also, the state line is on the Ohio side of the river, so most of the truss work is in West Virginia.

Note the "ramps" on the upstream side of the piers to breakup ice flows.
Photo from HAER WVA,26-BEN,1--1 from wv0122
I saved a copy of the satellite images because of the nice shadows. I labeled these notes with bridgeArch as well as bridgeTruss because of the 1871 stone arch approach on the Bellaire, OH side. You can get a close look at sandstone arches without getting your feet wet. The route that used this approach has been abandoned.
Satellite
Satellite
Wheeling and Lake Erie now has the former B&O assets in Bellaire, OH. If you look at a Google Photo, you can see the piers of the truss bridge are tall. This was probably not done for shipping but to maintain a level route from one river bank to the other. To maintain a level route, a viaduct had to carry the track across Bellaire, which is down in the river valley.

Street View
Street View
C Hanchey,  License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)
Carl Venzke posted
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Benwood Bridge, Benwood, Marshall County, WV
Historic American Engineering Record c1968
John Slowikowski Also made Hollywood famous in the movie Unstoppable

Donald Burden posted six photos of that viaduct with the comment:
Baltimore & Ohio's Great Stone Viaduct at Bellaire, Ohio. Built 1867-70, this sandstone structure contains 43 arches on the Ohio side of the river. Each arch ring contains 37 stones, representing the 37 states that, at that time, comprised the U.S. The eastern half remains active, but the tracks have been removed from the western half. Worth an inspection if you find yourself in the area.
The track curing north from the viaduct is still used, so that is why the eastern half is used. The track curving south is abandoned, so that is why the western half is unused. Fortunately, the bridge is still used.
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Railroad Images of Bygone Days posted
[A Google Map search for Belair offers Bellaire.]

Charlie Easton posted
I've shared this photo I took a few years ago on Abandoned Rails and a couple other sites. But it does represent a Fascinating Railroad Structure in my mind. B&O Viaduct, Bellaire OH. (Think "Unstoppable")
[Facebooked]

Charlie Easton posted
One of my favorite shots. Sometimes you work to compose the shot. Sometimes, (like this one) you lean out the car window and snap away! Haha. But I have always been enthralled with stone viaducts.
Charlie Easton Bellaire. To the left was the tank farm in Unstoppable. All cg.

Charlie Easton posted
One of my favorite photos. Bellaire viaduct. Think “Unstoppable”. Not sure if I posted this before but I’m ok with a repeat.
Author
Aaron Grace
, I think I've got the Bellaire history right. B&O came through. Central Ohio (later absorbed by B&O) went from Bellaire to Columbus. Pennsylvania came in later and shared the Ohio River crossing. 
Dennis DeBruler commented on Charlie's post
HAER: http://loc.gov/pictures/item/WV0122/

Robert Oxley posted
Nice old pick some one posted locally here in Bellaire from 1957. I was born in 58.
Robert Oxley This the span that parts of the 2010 film Unstoppable was shot on.

The trusses we see today are from a reconstruction completed in 1905.
Plate XII
The reconstruction started in 1893 by replacing spans 14 and 15 with wrought iron trusses. Work continued in 1900 using "soft open-hearth steel."

I learned while studying the RR bridge at Metropolis, IL that the river men wanted a 700' navigation channel. The War Department wanted that width here, which would have required a 730' truss. The War Department would probably have agreed to the span of 589.48' that was obtainable by removing pier 11 and lengthening piers 10 and 12 per Fig 1. That option would have cost $253,500 (1905 dollars) more than using the existing masonry.
Fig 1
To achieve a 700' wide channel, a lot of pier work would have to be done in addition to the 730' truss adding $563,000 (1905 dollars) to the cost.
Fig 2
Since
  • neither the War Department nor the shipping interests would help with the extra cost
  • the railroad was already running heavier locomotives and freight cars on both sides of the river and their investment in the other spans was currently being wasted
  • a July 14, 1862 Act of Congress approved the current pier locations
the railroad built trusses using the existing piers.

I wonder if this 300' navigation channel is now the skinniest on the Ohio River. The locks on the river have the standard width of 110'. It would seem that two-way traffic is still possible even with a narrow primary channel because the adjacent span was charted to be at least 220' wide. 

They were allowed to use falsework under Span 12, but not under Span 11. So they built Span 11 as a cantilever span. Span 12 was designed to handle the stresses of being a dead-load shore arm for Span 11 during construction as well as a live-load simple truss after construction. After the falsework was constructed under Span 12, the old span was removed and the live-load was carried by the falsework. This kept vibrations out of Span 12 and the west half of Span 11 during construction. Span 10 was not strong enough to function as a shore arm. So they built an additional truss on the outside of Span 10 to function as the shore arm. The weight of Span 12 was more than enough to offset the weight of half of Span 11. But the temporary shore arm truss around Span 10 too light, so they added counterweights to the Pier 9 end of the temporary truss.

The top cord of the old Span 11 truss was used to hold a 40-ton traveler. Before the traveler lifted members from a barge below, they would lock it down in a strong position on the old truss. Even so, they had to add temporary wooden braces to ensure that strains in the old truss members did not exceed 16,000 lb. per sq. in. I added red rectangles to the construction figure below to highlight the tie bars that were added between the top cords of the trusses so that the shore arms could hold up their halves of Span 11 until the halves were joined in the center. The new Span 11 was built around the old span so that only a dead load was supported during construction.
Plate XIV plus Paint



Monday, November 26, 2018

BNSF/Santa Fe over Hickory Creek in Joliet, IL

(Satellite; BNSF/Santa Fe is on the left, UP/GM&O is on the right)

Why yet another still girder RR bridge? Because I was impressed by the amount of concrete used here to channelize the creek. It has natural shores at the Metra/Rock Island overpass and the dam.

Zaky Joseph posted
Two Santa Fe warbonnet b40-8Ws head west, accelerating quickly out of Joliet, Illinois on a Z-WSP STO (Willow Springs, Illinois to Stockton, California) intermodal train. 11/25/97
Nick HartNick and 8 others are consistently creating meaningful discussions with their posts. Ah, right along Chicago Street near Patterson. Nice.Dennis DeBruler Over Hickory Creek: https://www.google.com/.../data=!3m6!1e1!3m4...
You can see high-water marks on Zaky's photo and the street view.
Street View

Sunday, November 25, 2018

New I-74 Bridge over Mississippi River at Molene/Bettendorf

(original I-74 bridges and plans for the new bridgeWebcam, satellite is below)

The $1.2 billion dollar project not only includes the new bridge, it includes a lot of road work on both sides of the river. Quite a few buildings were torn down, including a depot, in Bettendorf, IA for a new road alignment. A bed containing about 450,000 mussels had to be moved before the piers could be built.
Screenshot from Presentation on  Materials
Satellite
I'm using Bing instead of Google because Google is not showing any activity yet.

This crane photo is what let me know that construction had started on the replacement bridge and that it was time to reasearch the new bridge again.
Matt Saddoris commented on a posting, cropped
Ben Stalvey Micheles MLC 300?
Matt Saddoris Maxim Moline, Illinois

Map from Materials
Before they built the dam a couple of miles downstream from here, this stretch of the river must have been a rapids. That means the river scoured the bottom down to bedrock. So they are buildings piers keyed into the bedrock that can withstand the lateral forces of a true arch. Since it is a true arch rather than a tied arch, they don't have the option of building the arch near a shore and floating it into place like they did, for example, the Eggner Ferry Bridge. To keep the navigation channel open, they are using back stays to build the arches with 35' to 65' steel segments.
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p15
Beginning this fall or early winter [2018], crews will begin lifting the 35- to 65-foot steel segments into place. Currently, the steel segments are being fabricated at a plant in Gary, Ind., after which they will be trucked to the Quad-Cities, said Danielle Alvarez, the I-74 project manager with the Iowa Department of Transportation....Cable stays will be used to hold the segments into place, while the rest of the segments are raised and fitted together. There will actually be two arches in each direction on the new bridge, angling inward to form a pair of basket handles....Alvarez said the tied-arch design at Talbot Memorial Bridge (Centennial) between Davenport and Rock Island is more of typical of Mississippi River crossings, but the relatively shallow water depth and rock elevations under I-74 allowed for the new bridge to be a true-arch design. The cost of the steel fabrication, as well as putting the segments into place, is $17 million for both spans, according to the Iowa DOT. [ArchIsNextStep]
I have not been able to find construction photos of the arch construction.

The "Y" part of the piers looked like they could be precast "trophies" similar to the ones used for the new Pensacola Bay Bridge. But these photos shows they built the piers in place.
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p22
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p22

Roads & Bridges
Brad Gareston posted
Who says 650’s can’t float?
Lynn Johnson My friend in Galveston Texas built this barge. Heck of a setup!
[A comment indicates there are 20 booms in the air on this project.]
Brad commented on his posting
New bridge in the Quad City area. I’ll ask for me- said they moved her in from NJ.
Mike Ironman posted two photos that indicate funding must have been secured. Given the budget mess that Illinois had for a couple of years, this is interesting news.

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[Note all of the cranes in the background on the other side of the river.]

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I-74 River Bridge posted nine photos with the comment:
On a sunny Saturday morning, the first arch segment was successfully placed on the pier! Held up by a crane, the first arch segment, about 250,000 lbs of steel, was slowly lowered down to the top of the arch pier. Steel rods embedded in the pier were covered in PVC pipe to provide a guide as the iron workers lined them up with the arch segment. At times, the workers would need to make adjustments manually. It takes an incredible amount of patience and skill and we've got the best guys on the job.
Ben Stalvey shared with the comment: "MLC 300 and MLC 650 hard at work on I-74 what some impressive lifts wow"
John Schilberg Amazing design and build project. The scale is incredible.
Stan Indyk Not an easy piece to set for sure...



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Jake Swartz It’s obvious they have to be under there to guide peice , or they wouldn’t be there.

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I-74 River Bridge posted (source)
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Ben Stalvey MLC 650, MLC 300 and 2250

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Matt Van Zante Who is the formwork supplier?

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Debra Glenn Jones Sad. I'm going to miss the old bridge.

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I-74 River Bridge posted fifteen photos with the comment: "More photos of the arch being erected on the westbound piers as well as some of the awesome people who made it happen!"

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Roger Pigg So what if the darn thing is NOT level? Is there an adjusting screw? The supervisor watching is biting his glove in anticipation.

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Team huddle

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Kristopher Oswald Wonder if they got out the guy inside.... ha!I-74 River Bridge Kristopher Oswaldnope. The inside of the arch is pretty roomy so we think he'll be fine.

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Five photos posted by Jan Danielsen with the comment: "Cleva Lee --pool 15 --I-74 bridge work Bettendorf, Iowa--Moline, Illinois."
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Jan Danielsen posted seven photos of the construction.
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Three of the photos posted by Jan Danielson
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Sue Smabdman posted ten photos with the comment: "74 Bridge construction."
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Raw Images Art & Photography posted sixteen photos with the comment: "Kuddos to my husband for driving me across the I-74 Bridge so I could get some photos of the new I-74 River Bridge. They continue to make progress with all of the flooding in the area."
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Raw Images Art & Photography updated

Ben Stalvey shared
Dustin Williams have a mlc 300 and an mlc 650 on site . As well as 2 2250s
Raw Images Art & Photography posted
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I-74 River Bridge posted 12 photos with the comment: "Fresh photos from the construction sites!"

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Pouring concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Pouring concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Delivering concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Pouring concrete for a retaining wall for the new I-74 ramp in Moline (near 7th Ave)

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Compacting aggregate columns to stabilize the ground for an abutment wall in Moline (near 7th Ave)

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Load testing the aggregate columns to support the abutment wall in Moline

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Reconstructing westbound I-74 in Moline

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Constructing foundations along 19th Street in Moline

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Driving pile near 19th Street in Moline

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Excavating near 19th Street in Moline

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Constructing foundations along 19th St in Moline

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Newly constructed westbound I-74 lanes just prior to opening them to traffic in Bettendorf

One of 24 photos posted by I-74 River Bridge of the installation of the third arch segment on the Iowa side. (source)
Stephanie Pynckel Redecker How many bolts to hold this one in place?
I-74 River Bridge Stephanie Pynckel Redecker around 1,300.
[MLC650 with a 341' boom that can lift 771 tons.]
Ben Stalvey shared more photos of the installation of the third segment and more pier work. I wonder if the black thing near the top of the third segment is where they are going to attach cables from the falsework. Hopefully, we will soon see.

One of 31 more photos shared by Ben Stalvey. The first two by Raw Images Art & Photography are a couple from a year ago so that you can see the progress that has been made.

I-74 River Bridge posted thirteen photos.
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Placing steel girders on the piers near the Illinois shoreline

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Pumping water out of the tub forms, where workers are constructing the bridge foundations.

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The Iowa-bound bridge construction is on the right and the Illinois-bound bridge construction is on the left.

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Crews are constructing the foundations for the Illinois-bound bridge arch.

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Bridge construction looking towards Illinois.

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Constructing the new I-74 bridge (looking towards Iowa).

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Constructing the Iowa-bound and Illinois-bound bridge deck in Moline (looking south).

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Tying rebar to form the new ramp near 7th Avenue in Moline.

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes and reconstructing overpasses in Moline (looking north).

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes and reconstructing overpasses in Moline (looking south).

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes in Bettendorf (looking north).

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Preparing the slope wall at Mississippi Boulevard for a concrete pour (Bettendorf)

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Preparing the slope wall at Mississippi Boulevard for a concrete pour (Bettendorf)

Ben Stalvey shared Raw Images Art & Photography photo
What a shot of the MLC 300
Ben Mueller Sr. commented on Ben's post
Raw Images Art & Photography posted 15 photos with the comment:
It's been a little bit since I have posted on the new I-74 River Bridge construction (between Moline IL and Bettendorf IA). I left for a week and those Iron Workers have gotten so much done. It is sometimes hard to tell as people watch the arches, but if you have been following the process in putting up the pillars and such, they are making so much progress. Got to see many of them as they were getting off work tonight. They are always so friendly. Great job guys!!!
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Kelli Emerson comment on a Aug 30 video

I-74 River Bridge comment on a Aug 30 video

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One of 17 photos in the Sep 16, 2019 album

One of 24 photos in the Sep 23, 2019 album

Raw Images Art & Photography posted ten photos with the comment:
My wonderful husband drove me back over the I-74 bridge so I could take some more shots out the window from on top of the current bridge. Although there isn't another section of the arch on yet, things are moving pretty quickly everywhere else. Shout out to the guys dangling in the cage and those on top of the piers.
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I've noticed that the arch seems to be stuck at just three segments. I haven't seen anything about why the arch construction seems to be stuck.

Dustin Soerens posted six photos with the comment: "MLC650, MLC300, and two 2250s on the I-74 Bridge Project."
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Ben Stalvey shared an Oct 28, 2019, album of 16 progress photos. Ben confirmed the crane is a MLC 650 and it appears it is on a barge for the arch segment lifts.

Michael Lowing and Josh Morre provided three photos as commented on Ben's share of using two GMK 7550s to transload the segments to barges in East Chicago. (That probably means they were imported.)
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I was thinking just this week it has been a while since I saw how far the arches have progressed.
Raw Images Art & Photography posted fourteen photos with the comment:
More photos of the I-74 River Bridge between Moline IL and Bettendorf IA. The first are taken from the shore and the few at the end are taken from the old bridge. Looks like they are working on the decks to connect the shores to the base of the arches. Once the top of the arches are installed then the laying of the deck should go pretty quick. Meanwhile - just trying to be patient and enjoy the process. It's not everyday we get to witness history in the making.
Bob Nolen It will be 2030 before the IA bound traffic side is complete. Get a new contractor.
Raw Images Art & Photography Bob Nolen where are you getting your info?
Bob Nolen Raw Images Art & Photography It was on the local news. The contractor is deliberately dragging their feet trying to get more $ from IA.
Bob Nolen Raw Images Art & Photography Also construction workers were sworn to secrecy about what is going on, and after they go to another job they were opening up about how the contractor would have them busy building frames etc. Then when they were all done they cut them up and scrapped them. Don't you watch the local news?
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[A big, modern grain elevator in the right background.]

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Raw Images Art & Photography updated

Chris Ridenour commented on a post
There's a 300 we are on the 650 barge.

Ryan Drew posted
I-74 Bridge Quad Cities USA

April 5, 2020: I-74 River Bridge posted seven photos with the comment: "We successfully installed another arch segment today. Three more to go before we install the keystone."
James McAdam When you see the arches suspended above the river. Does it sway at all? You can only imagine they may sway a a tiny bit even though they are secured at the base and with support cables.
I-74 River Bridge Hi James McAdam , see the mouse trap-looking device in the second photo? That is a tuned mass damper, which helps suppress the vibrations and movement due to wind! The device will be removed when the bridge is complete because the structure itself will dissipate the force of the vibrations towards the piers/foundations in the river.
Brad Knutson What’s the timeline for the final three? Are they here and ready to be installed or will it be months between the final segments!
I-74 River Bridge Brad Knutson The next 3 segments are on site and anticipated to be installed over the next couple weeks. Then it will be several weeks before we can install the keystone (the middle segments that close each arch) because we will be working on assembling the pieces and conducting multiple surveys to ensure the correct fit up before installation. We’re working as quickly as possible to close the westbound arch in spring.
Jeff Hinke Not to get too far ahead, but when the west-bound keystones are in place and the non-permanent stays and crossbars are removed, will work start soonest on the east-bound arches, or does the west-bound have to be further along/finished (roadway etc) before that happens?
I-74 River Bridge Hi Jeff Hinke , we won’t be able to start the eastbound arch until we no longer need certain equipment (like the 650 ton crane) for westbound. We’ll have more info on the timeframe later this year.

Jay Von Holten Very interesting watching the progress. Are the segments welded together or are they bolted together?
I-74 River Bridge Jay Von Holten bolted

James Rabchuk No more guide wires? I thought there were going to be cables installed at three different elevations.
Mike Chiavario James Rabchuk originally the design called for 3 tie back cables but contractors design only called for 2 per arch.
James Rabchuk Mike Chiavario ok that makes sense. I was wondering what good that third set was going to do at that angle. Thanks!
James Rabchuk it’s been a year and a half since I saw George Ryan’s presentation on the construction, and his slides showed three sets per arch. He also clearly underestimated how long it would take to get those cables properly installed!

Alan Asay It is amazing that work continues on the unconstructable bridge.
Steven LeMaster Alan Asay that statement means for the bid price. Not actually unconstructable.
Alan Asay Steven LeMaster yet the contractor is still cashing the checks, delaying work and asking for more money. What a joke!
Steven LeMaster Alan Asay it is but normal practice from what some have explained I agree I do have a little inside information.
Alan Asay Steven LeMaster so black mail is normal business? The contractor should be fired and jailed for extortion.
Steven LeMaster Alan Asay LOL good luck no one disagrees.
[And then the dialogue gets nasty.]

Jeremy Tatman Yay! Only 1 year behind!

Ben Stalvey shared
Checkout all that bright red Manitowoc power. The way it should be.
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Mike Ironman posted three photos with the comment: "4/13/20: A Manitowoc Crane is Among Many others, As The New I-74 Bridge Work ( Between Bettendorf, Iowa & Moline, Illinois) Takes Place next to The Original Bridge. Cranes, Steel Beams, & Earth moving Equipment have been Things along with Trains I am intrigued by."
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I-74 River Bridge posted three photos with the comment:
Here's a view of our crane operator's "office." With a 341 ft boom and the ability to lift 650 tons (~ equivalent of 3 train locomotives), this massive Manitowoc crane is used to pick up each arch segment and guide it to the top of the arch. It takes careful planning and patience to lift and guide these segments correctly and safely to the arch. Ironworkers at the top of the arch and on the barge provide guidance to ensure the segment fits between the splice plates.
Aaron Casas How much does each arch segment weigh?
I-74 River Bridge Up to about 250,000 lbs.
Jim Cox I-74 River Bridge how much for those big deck sections in East Moline?
I-74 River Bridge Jim Cox it varies but up to about 300 tons.
[Some comments and photos about the USACE Quad Cities ringer on a barge.]
Levi Ludwigson Jamie Shields so with 341 feet of boom this crane is capable of picking 650 ton?
Jamie Shields Levi Ludwigson lol nope. Not even close. Max pick is 460k (230 Ton) in this configuration I think.
Levi Ludwigson Jamie Shields that's why I'm question the post. It's written like a CNN reporter wrote it.
[Levi posted charts, first a wrong one and then a correct one.]
Adam Ellis From what I read about it, it's 650 metric ton, which converts to about 716 us tons. Freaking monster!
Thomas Lee How much did this crane cost?
Andy VanHoe Thomas Lee $87 [I assume that is millions.]
Ben Stalvey shared
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Bryan Koskela check out those spuds.
[I was wondering how they could keep the tip of the crane stable with such a long boom.]

I-74 river Bridge posted nine photos with the comment: "Today we installed the 28th arch segment! The remaining two segments will be connected by struts (crossbeams) and installed as one “keystone” piece to complete the Iowa-bound arch. Over the next several weeks, we’ll be working on assembling the keystone, preparing the arch, and conducting multiple surveys to ensure the correct fit before we lift and install the keystone."
I-74 River Bridge TWe are replacing the interstate I-74 bridges between Moline, Illinois and Bettendorf, Iowa. Check out our website for more info at www.i74riverbridge.com.
James Rabchuk When did you guys take down the lower set of tie back cables?
I-74 River Bridge James Rabchuk a couple weeks ago.
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Raw Images Art & Photography posted 17 photos with the arch done except for the keystone.

One of twenty photos posted by Raw Images Art & Photography
Making more progress on the I-74 River Bridge today. They installed a floor that will be up for the next several weeks until the keystone is installed and in place. The floor is 30x60 foot and weighs 20,000 lbs. It was put together on the Illinois side approximately 3 weeks ago and build by Brand Safway. It is held up by 8 cables and there are eight backup cables as well. I was told it was raised as one section up and put in place in less than an hour. This bridge just keeps getting more exciting the more we see how it is put together. Another huge shout out to the ironworkers.
Pete Murray A question for the iron workers: what all is required to fasten that last section in between the spans? Gotta be hundreds (maybe thousands) of fasteners. It would be neat to see photos.
Mike Valle Pete Murray thousands of bolts buddy.

Ben Stalvey shared
Tom Miller What is the purpose of the floor?
Ben Stalvey Work Platform you mean?
Tom Miller Ben Stalvey I guess that what it could be for.
Benny Davis Osha [He meant OSHA. The work platform provides a safer environment for the ironworkers. It also allows more ironworkers to work on the thousands of bolts than worker baskets would allow. Several of the twenty photos show at least one of the three cranes was being used to hold a worker basket. The hourly rental of cranes probably soon pays for the platform. I assume they will use the platform again for the second arch.]

Raw Images Art & Photography posted 16 photos with the comment: "Here is a little eye candy for all you crane aficionados. Found the ironworkers out today working on the keystone piece. Winds were brutal. Huge shout out to these guys working on the I-74 River Bridge. Making progress....."
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Dana L. Corman Wehrle Look at the white caps!
Raw Images Art & Photography Dana L. Corman Wehrle the wind was brutal. The river has been raging since the flooding. It is dangerous out there and now the barges are out moving on the river too.

One of 26 photos posted by Raw Images Art & Photography  (source)

One of two photos posted by Raw Images Art & Photography
Ben Stalvey posted

Ted Fortier What did they use for anchors on the backstays?
Bill Strealy commented on Ted's comment on Ben's share
Two photos from an album of 16 photos of the keystone installation.
I-74 River Bridge posted four photos that Ben Stalvey shared.
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One of  39 photos of the keystone installation posted by Raw Images Art & Photography and shared by Ben Stalvey.
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An MLC 650 was used to lift the keystone.]

I-74 river Bridge posted three photos with the comment: "The keystone is fit snug between the arches. Working around the clock, ironworkers are securing the keystone with over 4,000 bolts! Here’s a look at some of the work at the top of the arch"
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Tammy Mutka posted eight photos with the comment: "A little eye candy from the I-74 River Bridge project in Bettendorf Iowa. The first one is from 9 pm last night and the others were taken at dawn this morning. [May 7, 2020]"
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Mike Ironman posted two photos with the comment: "6/21/20: Both I-74 Bridges on The Banks of The Mississippi River at Bettendorf, Iowa. Looking Towards Moline, Illinois. After Railfanning Lloyd Mangler Crossing, decided to check out my other Obsession as Well."
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One of 36 photos shared by Ben Stalvey

I-74 River Bridge posted three photos with the comment: "We installed another floor module this morning. Only one more to go! We’ve also got the first sections of the Illinois-bound arch on site. The first arch segment is anticipated to be installed in the coming weeks."
Jay Lambrecht How much clearance has your team predicted to have between the crane and current bridge when setting the arch pieces for the East bound lanes?
I-74 River Bridge Jay Lambrecht There is enough room for the arch segments but we’ll use a different process for the floor. Our plan is to use a combination of jacking systems and cranes to lift the floor modules for the Illinois-bound bridge.
Dale Lallier I was surprised to see how the floor went in, I thought you would put one section on one side and then go put a section on the other side and meet in the middle to distribute the weight somewhat evenly to the arch. Glad to see good progress though.
Jeff Cozad I saw that being installed this morning. I’m curious about the order these are being installed. I’d assumed that the section that is yet to be installed would have been the 4th one. Any particular reason?
I-74 River Bridge Hi Jeff Cozad there is a lot of coordination that takes place for installing the floor modules. The sequencing the contractor used is more efficient in terms of access, alignment and timing of navigation channel closures.
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[I'm leaving the "Add caption" text in as a monument to to Google's new blogspot software being  worse than their legacy software and their refusal to make small changes to make it as good as the old software. ("Add caption" was auto selected in the old version.)]

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[I'm leaving the "Add caption" text in as a monument to to Google's new blogspot software being  worse than their legacy software and their refusal to make small changes to make it as good as the old software. ("Add caption" was auto selected in the old version.)]

One of 25 photos posted by Raw Images Art & Photography
Yesterday [July 13, 2020] the next segment of the bridge floor was installed between the arches on the New I-74 River Bridge. One more section and the bridge will be linked from Bettendorf IA to Moline IL. They have also reported that they will begin working on the second span's arches soon. Making Progress every day!
Ben Stalvey shared

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Darian Foster Screenshot
New I74 bridge at Davenport-Bettendorf, Ia. April 6th. The pilings are completely under water as of yesterday. The Mighty Mississippi just roaring by!


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Screenshot
At 5:30, the talking head says that by the end of 2019 the westbound structure will be complete and open to traffic. But the photos that I have seen in 2020 don't even have the arch finished!

RoadBridges Sep 4, 2018
Contractors are employing both coffer dams and coffer cells to set piers in the river.

safe_image for RoadBridges Dec 31, 2018
Illinois-Iowa I-74 bridge will feature eight-story pedestrian elevator

Drone video of the construction   They have some piers done on one side and are still working on the caissons for the other side.

Ben Stalvey shared a drone flyby.  He is back to the bridge at 3:15 with some parked cranes in the upper-right corner.
Sean Hill commented on Ben's share

Sean Hill commented on Ben's share

Luis Gregorio Lizando commented on Ben's share


(new window) An alternative construction technique to cranes on barges that doesn't care about floods and ice flows.


Screenshot from a timelapse