Friday, November 30, 2018

St. Charles Air Line Bridge Before Elevation

There are a lot of photos of the current Strauss trunnion-heel bridge. Photos of the swingbridge that existed before the tracks were elevated and the river was straightened are rare enough that they deserve there own posting rather than getting lost in the existing posting.

The last photo from eight photos of elevating the tracks northeast of here is worth copying.

Paul Petraitis posted
11am 9/23/1905, Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District
Ean Kahn-Treras We are looking off of 18th Street in this view. The elevated track is the IC iowa division curving for their crossing of the RI at 16th Street.
Mark E. Vaughan Wasn’t the Erie carfloat interchange operation in this area also?
Bob Lalich The Erie Lake Line had two stations, both of which were farther north. Information describing the operations can be found here: http://freepages.rootsweb.com/.../genealogy/erielakechi.html

Bob Lalich commented on Paul's posting
The bridge seen here is the SCAL swing bridge. The yard here is C&WI's 18th St Yard. 16th St Tower can be seen in the distance. Here is the smoke abatement map of the area.

1897 Map
Paul's posting is also one of the better views I have seen of Burlington's grain elevators that were next to some slips off the South Branch.

James Boudreaux posted
Elevating the St. Charles Airline from Chicago Union Stations' south main line. Bottom L/S quadrant is now Amtraks' 16th St. diesel shop and yard (ex Penn Central, Pennsylvania RR). Upper R/S quadrant is Metras' yard (ex CB&Qs' Zephyr Pit)

David Daruszka also posted
St. Charles Airline track elevation under construction.
Bob Lalich That is a beer bottle from the Schoenhofen brewery. http://forgottenchicago.com/articles/schoenhofen-brewery/

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Cleveland's "High Road" Bridges

1878  Superior Viaduct:
   (Bridge Hunter; Satellite, note that the streetcar tracks still exist in part of it)
1917+1965+1997  Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge:
   (Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges; HAER; 3D Satellite, 174+ photos)

Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
A view of the viaduct shortly after it opened in 1878.
The following photo raised the question of why does a stone viaduct just end? The short answer is that the swing span was removed after the Superior Viaduct was replaced by the Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge. As you can image, the rest of this page is the long answer.
Robert Pempsell posted
The first high-level bridge across the Cuyahoga Valley was started in March 1875 and opened in Dec. 1878. Because it had a swing span, road traffic would still be stopped by some river traffic. But there would be far fewer stoppages than suffered by the low-level bridges. Plus it saved braking your buggy or wagon while going down into the valley and then the horse having to pull it back out of the valley on the other side. [ClevelandHistorical]
Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
In this photograph from 1912, the center span of the Superior Viaduct has opened to a let a ship pass underneath.
[Note the abundance of streetcars and the scarcity of cars in 1912. I found one car and a couple of trucks.]
Photo from ClevelandHistorical, Image courtesy of the Library of Congress
The swinging, center span of the Superior Avenue Viaduct, circa 1900.
In 1917 a higher level bridge was built so that no river traffic would impact the traffic on the bridge. The approaches are reinforced concrete arches and the 590' main span over the river is, obviously, a steel arch. The upper level was designed for four lanes of traffic and the lower level held six streetcar tracks. The streetcar deck was abandoned in 1955. The swing span was removed from the Superior Viaduct in 1923.
Photo from HAER OHIO,18-CLEV,22--28 (CT) from oh0124
Please see the links at the top for more information about the 1917 bridge.

This "hold Ctrl and move the mouse" Google View shows that several of the old stone arches still exist on the western side. It also shows the bridge that replaced it in the background.
Google Maps
It is interesting that the smaller arches under the upper deck of the eastern approach of the 1917 bridge don't appear in the above view. I captured this street view to confirm that the missing inter-deck arches are because I was pushing Google's 3D algorithm really hard to get a view of the stone arches.
Street View
Some of the arches of the 1878 bridge were removed in 1938.
Image courtesy of Cleveland State Library Special Collections
An arch is soon to be torn down in this 1938 photograph. Several of the viaduct's arches still stand on the west side of the river.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

BNSF/NP 1911+1928 Bridges over Duwamish River in Seattle, WA

(1911 Bridge Hunter1928 Bridge Hunter, 3D Satellite)

While looking at a satellite map for the BNSF/GN bridge over the Lake Washington Ship Canal, I spotted this bridge on the satellite map. And then within 24 hours I saw this posting.

Guy Prior posted the comment:
Hello fellow bridge and tunnel admirers I have just acquired the Walthers bascule bridge. Reading the blurb it stated that this model is based on the real thing crossing the Duwamish river in Seattle Washington. Apparently it is still in use by BNSF and I was wondering if anyone had a photo of a bascule bridge crossing the Duwamish they could share?🤔🤔. I want to maybe give it that look, anything will help. Cheers🤓


Nicholas Boyd commented on Guy's posting
The Bridge Hunter pages for this bridge taught me that Strauss' early designs put the lift machinery on the end of the top cord of the movable span and his later designs moved the machinery to the stationary counterweight tower. The Strauss bridge in Ashtabula, OH, is an example of an early design that never got converted to the later design. This bridge was converted in 1928. Judging from the platform still remaining at the end of the top cord of the span on the close by Salmon Bay Bridge, I presume it is another converted bridge.




Tuesday, November 27, 2018

WLE/B&O 1905 Benwood Bridge over the Ohio River at Bellaire, OH

(Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges; HAER; see below for satellite)

WLE = Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway

Evidently it is called Benwood instead of Bellaire because B&O had their yard on the Benwood, WV side. Also, the state line is on the Ohio side of the river, so most of the truss work is in West Virginia.

Note the "ramps" on the upstream side of the piers to breakup ice flows.
Photo from HAER WVA,26-BEN,1--1 from wv0122
I saved a copy of the satellite images because of the nice shadows. I labeled these notes with bridgeArch as well as bridgeTruss because of the 1871 stone arch approach on the Bellaire, OH side. You can get a close look at sandstone arches without getting your feet wet. The route that used this approach has been abandoned.
Satellite
Satellite
Street View
Street View
C Hanchey,  License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)
Carl Venzke posted
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Benwood Bridge, Benwood, Marshall County, WV
Historic American Engineering Record c1968
John Slowikowski Also made Hollywood famous in the movie Unstoppable

Charlie Easton posted
One of my favorite shots. Sometimes you work to compose the shot. Sometimes, (like this one) you lean out the car window and snap away! Haha. But I have always been enthralled with stone viaducts.
Charlie Easton Bellaire. To the left was the tank farm in Unstoppable. All cg.
Dennis DeBruler commented on Charlie's post
HAER: http://loc.gov/pictures/item/WV0122/

The trusses we see today are from a reconstruction completed in 1905.
Plate XII
The reconstruction started in 1893 by replacing spans 14 and 15 with wrought iron trusses. Work continued in 1900 using "soft open-hearth steel."

I learned while studying the RR bridge at Metropolis, IL that the river men wanted a 700' navigation channel. The War Department wanted that width here, which would have required a 730' truss. The War Department would probably have agreed to the span of 589.48' that was obtainable by removing pier 11 and lengthening piers 10 and 12 per Fig 1. That option would have cost $253,500 (1905 dollars) more than using the existing masonry.
Fig 1
To achieve a 700' wide channel, a lot of pier work would have to be done in addition to the 730' truss adding $563,000 (1905 dollars) to the cost.
Fig 2
Since
  • neither the War Department nor the shipping interests would help with the extra cost
  • the railroad was already running heavier locomotives and freight cars on both sides of the river and their investment in the other spans was currently being wasted
  • a July 14, 1862 Act of Congress approved the current pier locations
the railroad built trusses using the existing piers.

I wonder if this 300' navigation channel is now the skinniest on the Ohio River. The locks on the river have the standard width of 110'. It would seem that two-way traffic is still possible even with a narrow primary channel because the adjacent span was charted to be at least 220' wide. 

They were allowed to use falsework under Span 12, but not under Span 11. So they built Span 11 as a cantilever span. Span 12 was designed to handle the stresses of being a dead-load shore arm for Span 11 during construction as well as a live-load simple truss after construction. After the falsework was constructed under Span 12, the old span was removed and the live-load was carried by the falsework. This kept vibrations out of Span 12 and the west half of Span 11 during construction. Span 10 was not strong enough to function as a shore arm. So they built an additional truss on the outside of Span 10 to function as the shore arm. The weight of Span 12 was more than enough to offset the weight of half of Span 11. But the temporary shore arm truss around Span 10 too light, so they added counterweights to the Pier 9 end of the temporary truss.

The top cord of the old Span 11 truss was used to hold a 40-ton traveler. Before the traveler lifted members from a barge below, they would lock it down in a strong position on the old truss. Even so, they had to add temporary wooden braces to ensure that strains in the old truss members did not exceed 16,000 lb. per sq. in. I added red rectangles to the construction figure below to highlight the tie bars that were added between the top cords of the trusses so that the shore arms could hold up their halves of Span 11 until the halves were joined in the center. The new Span 11 was built around the old span so that only a dead load was supported during construction.
Plate XIV plus Paint



Monday, November 26, 2018

BNSF/Santa Fe over Hickory Creek in Joliet, IL

(Satellite; BNSF/Santa Fe is on the left, UP/GM&O is on the right)

Why yet another still girder RR bridge? Because I was impressed by the amount of concrete used here to channelize the creek. It has natural shores at the Metra/Rock Island overpass and the dam.

Zaky Joseph posted
Two Santa Fe warbonnet b40-8Ws head west, accelerating quickly out of Joliet, Illinois on a Z-WSP STO (Willow Springs, Illinois to Stockton, California) intermodal train. 11/25/97
Nick HartNick and 8 others are consistently creating meaningful discussions with their posts. Ah, right along Chicago Street near Patterson. Nice.Dennis DeBruler Over Hickory Creek: https://www.google.com/.../data=!3m6!1e1!3m4...
You can see high-water marks on Zaky's photo and the street view.
Street View

Sunday, November 25, 2018

New I-74 Bridge over Mississippi River at Molene/Bettendorf

(original I-74 bridges and plans for the new bridgeWebcam, satellite is below)

The $1.2 billion dollar project not only includes the new bridge, it includes a lot of road work on both sides of the river. Quite a few buildings were torn down, including a depot, in Bettendorf, IA for a new road alignment. A bed containing about 450,000 mussels had to be moved before the piers could be built.
Screenshot from Presentation on  Materials
Satellite
I'm using Bing instead of Google because Google is not showing any activity yet.

This crane photo is what let me know that construction had started on the replacement bridge and that it was time to reasearch the new bridge again.
Matt Saddoris commented on a posting, cropped
Ben Stalvey Micheles MLC 300?
Matt Saddoris Maxim Moline, Illinois

Map from Materials
Before they built the dam a couple of miles downstream from here, this stretch of the river must have been a rapids. That means the river scoured the bottom down to bedrock. So they are buildings piers keyed into the bedrock that can withstand the lateral forces of a true arch. Since it is a true arch rather than a tied arch, they don't have the option of building the arch near a shore and floating it into place like they did, for example, the Eggner Ferry Bridge. To keep the navigation channel open, they are using back stays to build the arches with 35' to 65' steel segments.
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p15
Beginning this fall or early winter [2018], crews will begin lifting the 35- to 65-foot steel segments into place. Currently, the steel segments are being fabricated at a plant in Gary, Ind., after which they will be trucked to the Quad-Cities, said Danielle Alvarez, the I-74 project manager with the Iowa Department of Transportation....Cable stays will be used to hold the segments into place, while the rest of the segments are raised and fitted together. There will actually be two arches in each direction on the new bridge, angling inward to form a pair of basket handles....Alvarez said the tied-arch design at Talbot Memorial Bridge (Centennial) between Davenport and Rock Island is more of typical of Mississippi River crossings, but the relatively shallow water depth and rock elevations under I-74 allowed for the new bridge to be a true-arch design. The cost of the steel fabrication, as well as putting the segments into place, is $17 million for both spans, according to the Iowa DOT. [ArchIsNextStep]
I have not been able to find construction photos of the arch construction.

The "Y" part of the piers looked like they could be precast "trophies" similar to the ones used for the new Pensacola Bay Bridge. But these photos shows they built the piers in place.
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p22
ShoolPresentation from Materials, p22

Roads & Bridges
Brad Gareston posted
Who says 650’s can’t float?
Lynn Johnson My friend in Galveston Texas built this barge. Heck of a setup!
[A comment indicates there are 20 booms in the air on this project.]
Brad commented on his posting
New bridge in the Quad City area. I’ll ask for me- said they moved her in from NJ.
Mike Ironman posted two photos that indicate funding must have been secured. Given the budget mess that Illinois had for a couple of years, this is interesting news.

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[Note all of the cranes in the background on the other side of the river.]

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I-74 River Bridge posted nine photos with the comment:
On a sunny Saturday morning, the first arch segment was successfully placed on the pier! Held up by a crane, the first arch segment, about 250,000 lbs of steel, was slowly lowered down to the top of the arch pier. Steel rods embedded in the pier were covered in PVC pipe to provide a guide as the iron workers lined them up with the arch segment. At times, the workers would need to make adjustments manually. It takes an incredible amount of patience and skill and we've got the best guys on the job.
Ben Stalvey shared with the comment: "MLC 300 and MLC 650 hard at work on I-74 what some impressive lifts wow"
John Schilberg Amazing design and build project. The scale is incredible.
Stan Indyk Not an easy piece to set for sure...



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Jake Swartz It’s obvious they have to be under there to guide peice , or they wouldn’t be there.

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I-74 River Bridge posted (source)
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Ben Stalvey MLC 650, MLC 300 and 2250

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Matt Van Zante Who is the formwork supplier?

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Debra Glenn Jones Sad. I'm going to miss the old bridge.

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I-74 River Bridge posted fifteen photos with the comment: "More photos of the arch being erected on the westbound piers as well as some of the awesome people who made it happen!"

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Roger Pigg So what if the darn thing is NOT level? Is there an adjusting screw? The supervisor watching is biting his glove in anticipation.

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Team huddle

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Kristopher Oswald Wonder if they got out the guy inside.... ha!I-74 River Bridge Kristopher Oswaldnope. The inside of the arch is pretty roomy so we think he'll be fine.

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Five photos posted by Jan Danielsen with the comment: "Cleva Lee --pool 15 --I-74 bridge work Bettendorf, Iowa--Moline, Illinois."
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Jan Danielsen posted seven photos of the construction.
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Three of the photos posted by Jan Danielson
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Sue Smabdman posted ten photos with the comment: "74 Bridge construction."
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Raw Images Art & Photography posted sixteen photos with the comment: "Kuddos to my husband for driving me across the I-74 Bridge so I could get some photos of the new I-74 River Bridge. They continue to make progress with all of the flooding in the area."
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Raw Images Art & Photography updated

Ben Stalvey shared
Dustin Williams have a mlc 300 and an mlc 650 on site . As well as 2 2250s
Raw Images Art & Photography posted
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I-74 River Bridge posted 12 photos with the comment: "Fresh photos from the construction sites!"

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Pouring concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Pouring concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Delivering concrete for the eastbound pier footing on the Illinois side of the river

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Pouring concrete for a retaining wall for the new I-74 ramp in Moline (near 7th Ave)

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Compacting aggregate columns to stabilize the ground for an abutment wall in Moline (near 7th Ave)

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Load testing the aggregate columns to support the abutment wall in Moline

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Reconstructing westbound I-74 in Moline

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Constructing foundations along 19th Street in Moline

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Driving pile near 19th Street in Moline

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Excavating near 19th Street in Moline

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Constructing foundations along 19th St in Moline

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Newly constructed westbound I-74 lanes just prior to opening them to traffic in Bettendorf

One of 24 photos posted by I-74 River Bridge of the installation of the third arch segment on the Iowa side. (source)
Stephanie Pynckel Redecker How many bolts to hold this one in place?
I-74 River Bridge Stephanie Pynckel Redecker around 1,300.
[MLC650 with a 341' boom that can lift 771 tons.]
Ben Stalvey shared more photos of the installation of the third segment and more pier work. I wonder if the black thing near the top of the third segment is where they are going to attach cables from the falsework. Hopefully, we will soon see.

One of 31 more photos shared by Ben Stalvey. The first two by Raw Images Art & Photography are a couple from a year ago so that you can see the progress that has been made.

I-74 River Bridge posted thirteen photos.
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Placing steel girders on the piers near the Illinois shoreline

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Pumping water out of the tub forms, where workers are constructing the bridge foundations.

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The Iowa-bound bridge construction is on the right and the Illinois-bound bridge construction is on the left.

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Crews are constructing the foundations for the Illinois-bound bridge arch.

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Bridge construction looking towards Illinois.

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Constructing the new I-74 bridge (looking towards Iowa).

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Constructing the Iowa-bound and Illinois-bound bridge deck in Moline (looking south).

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Tying rebar to form the new ramp near 7th Avenue in Moline.

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes and reconstructing overpasses in Moline (looking north).

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes and reconstructing overpasses in Moline (looking south).

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Expanding the Iowa-bound I-74 roadway to three lanes in Bettendorf (looking north).

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Preparing the slope wall at Mississippi Boulevard for a concrete pour (Bettendorf)

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Preparing the slope wall at Mississippi Boulevard for a concrete pour (Bettendorf)

Ben Stalvey shared Raw Images Art & Photography photo
What a shot of the MLC 300
Ben Mueller Sr. commented on Ben's post
Raw Images Art & Photography posted 15 photos with the comment:
It's been a little bit since I have posted on the new I-74 River Bridge construction (between Moline IL and Bettendorf IA). I left for a week and those Iron Workers have gotten so much done. It is sometimes hard to tell as people watch the arches, but if you have been following the process in putting up the pillars and such, they are making so much progress. Got to see many of them as they were getting off work tonight. They are always so friendly. Great job guys!!!
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Kelli Emerson comment on a Aug 30 video

I-74 River Bridge comment on a Aug 30 video

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One of 17 photos in the Sep 16, 2019 album

One of 24 photos in the Sep 23, 2019 album

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Darian Foster Screenshot
New I74 bridge at Davenport-Bettendorf, Ia. April 6th. The pilings are completely under water as of yesterday. The Mighty Mississippi just roaring by!


(new window) (source)


Drone video of the construction   They have some piers done on one side and are still working on the caissons for the other side.