Friday, August 31, 2018

BNSF/CB&Q 1984 Bridge over St. Croix River at Mississippi River (Prescott, WI)

(Bridge Hunter, 3D Satellite)

Bob Freitag shared
BNSF lift bridge, Prescott, WI from BNSF Historical Society Facebook Page.
Carolyn Susor commented on Bridge Hunter:
I call this the "Mickey Mouse" bridge because the tower sheaves look like Mickey Mouse's ears.

Ted Gregory updated
Ted GregoryTed and 1 other manage the membership, moderators, settings, and posts for Fascinating Railroad Structures. The BNSF (CB&Q) drawbridge across the St Croix is actually on the MN/WI state line. In this view, I am standing on the Prescott, WI side. This bridge can be a serious bottleneck as its double track on both ends. This is BNSF's Twin Cities to Galesburg, IL mainline. At Galesburg, IL, BNSF comes in from 6 different directions in to a massive hump yard (most traffic continues to Chicago).Marty Bernard The BNSF does have a line from Savanna to Galesburg. Don;t know what shape it is in.Ted GregoryTed and 1 other manage the membership, moderators, settings, and posts for Fascinating Railroad Structures. Jeff Marty I believe traffic splits near Savannah at Plum River. Priority traffic heads east to Rochelle and Aurora. Freights drop south thru Denrock, Barstow, Colona, Orion, Rio, Galesburg. South from Plum River is also old Q.
I havent beeb south of 
Savannah to Galesburg yet. Track looks really good on Google maps. I saw an auto rack train at Gburg, a rail train near Rio, on Google satellite. All I could tell you is the amount of traffic that runs through Rochelle on BNSF is nowhere near what runs out of the Twin Cities.

Zach Stagman posted
Prescott WI lift bridge
Tom Lietz posted three photos with the comment: "South bound container train crossing the lift bridge in Prescott, WI.
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Thursday, August 30, 2018

Pennsy Cummings Branch

Dennis DeBruler posted four photos with the comment:
A Joe Usselman photo, used with permission.
Joe's comment: "A crappy shot of the BRC while standing on the former PRR Cummings branch in Chicago in 2010."
Bob Lalich commented: "The ex-PRR Cummings Branch was abandoned in the early 70s I believe, and the bridge over the BRC was removed to provide better clearance. It branched off the Ft Wayne line just west of Rock Island Jct, passed over the BRC to South Works, Rock Island and BRC to 100th St tracks on its own bridges, then paralleled the BRC down to 105th St."
Additional comments are on the photos.
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The train in the background on the left is on the BRC-NS/Pennsy connector. It is one of the few tracks left in the Rock Island Junction. The bridges from left (north) to right are a B&OCT remnant of a Strauss trunnion bascule, 2 NYC abandoned lift bridges, a hole where a PRR lift bridge used to be, the NS/PRR lift bridge, and the Skyway.

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This abandoned overpass over 95th street is a remnant of the branch. The trees verify that it has been abandoned for a long time.https://www.google.com/maps/@41.7227536,-87.5479789,113m/data=!3m1!1e3
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This 1938 aerial photo caught a train on the branch so it is easy to follow the route of the branch.
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The dark diagonal line at the top center of this 1938 aerial photo is the Cummings branch. It connected with railroads that served Wisconsin Steel that was south of 106th. This photo excerpt shows just part of the Wisconsin Steel complex. I didn't find any other businesses west of the PRR branch. So when Wisconsin Steel went bankrupt, the purpose of this branch disappeared.


xxx

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

CSX+SEPTA/Reading 1912 Bridge over Delaware River at Yardley, PA

(Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges has 11 bridges in Buck County, but not this one; HAER3D Satellite)

Photo from HAER PA,9-YARD,8--1 from pa3720
[We see the piers of the previous Whipple truss bridge.]

Jim Perry posted
Reading RR bridge over the Delaware River. CSX & SEPTA use it now.
Shane Blische This concrete arch bridge at Yardley, P.A. was built by Philadelphia & Reading Railroad in 1913, replacing a much older wooden truss bridge co-built in 1876 by the North Penn Railroad and Delaware & Bound Brook Railroad. These two companies were constructing the National Railway which was intended to compete with Pennsylvania Railroad's New York Division (today the NorthEast Corridor). The NPRR an D&BB were absorbed into P&R by 1879. P&R reorganized as Reading Railroad (RDG) in 1924. Used by SEPTA's West Trenton Line and CSX's Trenton Subdivision, this bridge sees approximately 30 trains a day. Norfolk Southern crosses the Delaware River at Phillipsburg, N.J.-Easton, P.A. on the former Central Railroad of New Jersey truss bridge.

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Trail/lawsuit/UP/Katy (MKT) Bridges over Missisouri River at Boonvilee, MO

(1874 Bridge Hunter, 1896 Bridge Hunter, 1932 Bridge Hunter, no Historic Bridges, John MarvigSatellite)

1932 Bridge Hunter has a timeline of the saving of this bridge. Of note, the MO AG sued the MO DNR director to not give the bridge back to UP. UP wanted to move some of the spans to another project.

The rails-to-trails web-presence

Wayne Lammers posted four photos with the comment:
Hi. I'm a new member to this FB page. These are some of my Boonville, MO Katy (MKT) railroad bridge collection. This bridge was built and finished in1873. It was changed over the years and was given to the city of Boonville. We are presently converting it to be a large part of the Missouri Katy Trail State Park. If there is interest, I will post more images of our beautiful 408 foot lift span bridge. The last photo is what it looks like now.
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Construction of the MKT railroad bridge in 1872.

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This is the south Boonville entrance to the finished, MK&T RR Bridge. Just look how they built bridges back some 145 years ago!!!

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This is the reconstruction of the bridge in 1886.

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From the center of the Missouri River at Boonville, MO
(new window)  Shot in 1986. They were still running with cabooses!


(new window)  I shoved the position indicator quite frequently.


Katy Bridge Boonville posted
An awesome image of the bridge during the flood of 1903
Charles Wells Sure looks like "Everything" is under water over at Franklin! Think this was far more a common occurrence than one might imagine, especially during spring and late fall! Too bad the Katy did not build farther up on higher ground!
The US Army Core of Engineers supports a 9-foot channel on the river to Souix City, IA. [USACE] A 2-million pound, 408' long lift span is rather impressive. If it is locked, it would have to be high enough to clear pushboats (towboats). Fortunately, that is not near as high as the old steamboats needed. I have written about preserved lift bridges that have added ramps up to the locked lift span. Of course, I now can't remember where I wrote that. And Google's Blogspot broke the author's search function on April 3, 2018, so I'm not even going to try to find the preserved lift trail.

Looking at some of the elevation shots, this bridge was built for 9-foot channel barge traffic, not steamboats, because the towers are so short. It looks like even fully raised, ramps on the bridge would have to go up just 20 to 30 feet high. It is interesting that I can't find any info on the plans for the lift span. Are they going to hire a state park ranger to operate it or are they going to lock it in the up position and build ramps? The state park system staffing a lift bridge would be a notable preservation, and tourist attraction, option. But if Missouri politicians are as incompetent as Illinois politicians, the state park system won't be funded to do anything noteworthy. (For example, the Illinois state park closed their Tunnel Hill State Trail facility.)






Monday, August 27, 2018

RJ Corman/Conrail/Pennsy Curved Bridge over Tuscarawas River in Massillon, OH

(Bridge Hunter)
Satellite
Sam Busic posted
Former PRR bridge, Massillon OH, built in 1948, it curves as it spans the water, making it somewhat unique.
Herb WilsonHerb and 704 others joined RAILROAD BRIDGES, TRESTLES, TUNNELS AND CUTS within the last two weeks. Give them a warm welcome into your community! still in use?
Sam BusicSam and 704 others joined RAILROAD BRIDGES, TRESTLES, TUNNELS AND CUTS within the last two weeks. Give them a warm welcome into your community! Yes it is...I saw some Norfolk Southern cars around there today.
Dennis DeBruler Bridge Hunter indicates it is now used by a short line, R J Corman https://www.google.com/.../@40.7920858,-81.../data=!3m1!1e3
Tom Lane I think that is an awesome bridge, always loved the curve/skew combination of that bridge with vertical and enclined end posts.
It was built in 1948, which is rather late for a truss RR bridge. In the satellite image it appears you can see the piers of the previous bridge south of the existing bridge.

Paul Puljic posted
Massillon, Ohio. Picture taken from The Veterans Memorial bridge looking south.

Sunday, August 26, 2018

CN/WC Arcola High Bridges over St. Croix River

(Bridge Hunter (has several construction photos below John's photos), Historic Bridges, John Weeks IIISatellite)

John Weeks III
Technically this is not an arch bridge. Judging from this construction photo, it is a cantilever bridge. But I also labeled it as an arch bridge to make it easier to find.

Photo from Bridge Hunter, Public Domain: Published Prior to 1923
Jordan Palmer posted two photos with the comment:
Wisconsin Central Bridge at Arcola, Minnesota then and now. Built in 1884 by Union Bridge and Iron Works it was part of WCs route from Chippewa Falls to St. Paul. The original bridge was removed on February 28 1916 following replacement with the Arcola Highbridge completed in 1909. First photo is from Minnesota Historical Society, second one is mine from several years ago.
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Harvey Henkelmann commented on Jordan's posting
And here is it's famous replacement
Digitized by Google
Jordan Palmer posted two photos with the comment:
Couple more shots of my favorite bridge, the Arcola High Bridge, aka the Soo Line or Wisconsin Central Higbridge. The bridge stands roughly 185 feet above the St Croix River below at normal water level, and has five arches each roughly 300' long, plus approach trestles on each side stretching the bridge to nearly 1/2mile total length. The first photo is from a river trip nine or ten years ago now, and the second is from September of last year when I was finally able to catch a train rumbling across it. The Arcola High Bridge is now nearly 110 years old, and replaced the original Arcola crossing just down river 3/4mile that was built in the 1880s removing the long steep grades on both sides of the river as the original bridge was only about 70' above the river.
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Jordan Palmer commented on his posting
One of my winter shots from few years ago.

Jordan Palmer commented on his posting
And a shot from bout 1/2 mile or so south bout five years ago.
A better exposure of the construction photo:
Digitized by Google


Saturday, August 25, 2018

CSX/C&O Great Bend Tunnel and John Henry

Satellite plus Paint
The Great Bend Tunnel was constructed by the C&O in 1870-72, and it was over a mile long. It made the reputation for John Henry as "the steel driving man" because he had a race with a steam-driven drill. [History of West Virginia Railroads, search for John Henry]

Jackie Fry, cropped

Friday, August 24, 2018

Erie 1848 Viaduct over Starrucca Creek in Lanesboro, PA

(Bridge Hunter, Historic Bridges, HAER, Satellite 56+ photos)

Note the date, 1848. This is one of the last stone arch bridges built because the use of wrought iron trestles was developed. The variance in the height of the stones is interesting.

Photo from PA,58-LANBO,1--18 from pa1270
GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Erie Railway, Delaware Division, Bridge 189.46, Spanning Starucca Creek, East of Susquehanna River, Lanesboro, Susquehanna County, PA
Postcard circa 1907 from Bridge Hunter
Alexander T Davidson commented on his posting
Photo By HPhistorysocietylady [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons
Dale Woodland posted
February 15, 1969 eastbound train pushed by one of two remaining FM Trainmasters over Starucca Viaduct with a D&H train about to come under the bridge.
Gerard Geisler posted
Erie Railroad promotional brochure.





Thursday, August 23, 2018

CSX/C&O+HV 1917 Bridge over Ohio River at Sciotoville in Portsmouth, OH

(Bridge Hunter, Historic Bridges, Bridges & TunnelsSatellite)

Also known as the Limeville Bridge.

Historic Bridges
Is Anand shared a Marco Delgado photo
Scott Burrell For many years it carried the highest live/dead weight rating of any bridge in existence.
Donald Montgomery Wow, bet it takes 3 months or longer to inspect...

Stu Levene photo:
The seldom-photographed Sciotoville (Limeville) Bridge towers above a CSX train of 129 empty coal hoppers. The shot was taken from on top of the parapet at the south side of the bridge.
Appalachian Railfan photo:
A coal train makes it way westbound (TT Direction) with coal destined for points north as the final light of day is setting over the Ohio River. A scene like this only makes me reflect on a time when it was possible to see C&O Superpower haul miles of black diamonds along this route. What a sight that would have been to see.
"This bridge held the record for longest continuous truss span [775'] in the world from its opening until 1945. See April 2000 Trains Magazine for an article on this bridge." [Bridge Hunter] It was also the heaviest. [Historic Bridges] "It remains today the mightiest bridge ever built from the point of view of its load capacity." [cohs]

McClintic-Marshall Company booklet from Historic Bridges

Gary Bellamy commented on a posting
Ken L. Chamblin commented on a posting
Here is a view from the Ky side taken by me from my train 

Ken L. Chamblin commented on a posting
Got Tunnel Vision?

Engineering News-Record Vol. 80, No. 2, p62 from Historic Bridges
One side was built on falsework. Then the cantilever design allowed the other side to be built with minimal falsework because the first side was available to balance it. But the forces on the joints changed between the initial truss structure on the first side and the final cantilevered truss so hydraulic jacks were needed to join some of the members for riveting. The following catches the center pier completed, wooden piers used as falsework, a travelling gantry on the false work to build the supported span, and a creeper hoist on the other side of the center pier to build the suspended span.

Engineering News-Record, Jan 31, 1918, p221 from Historic Bridges
"It contains some of the most massive members and chords ever seen in a truss bridge." [Historic Bridges] The following shows a member that requires both booms of the hoisting tower to lift it.

Engineering News-Record Vol. 80, No. 2, p66 from Historic Bridges
A pictorial summary of the construction stages. As the suspended span grew, they could remove some of the false work under the supported span because it was being held up by the weight of the suspended span. Reducing the number of falsework piers in the river was important in the Winter to reduce the impact of ice flows on the falsework.

Engineering News-Record, Jan 31, 1918, p235 from Historic Bridges
One of three photos posted by Charles E. Whisnant


The massive size of the members is caught by this photo. I had to look a while before I did find some men in the photo.

Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. LXXXV, 1922, p931 from Historic Bridges
Three photos by Dave Honan with the comment:
A couple miles east of Portsmouth, OH, is CSX's massive Sciotoville Bridge, a two-span, 1,550-foot continuous truss bridge over the Ohio River. The structure, the heaviest continuous truss bridge on the continent, was designed by David Steinman and built by Gustav Lindenthal between 1914-17 for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway. (April 05, 2004)
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Ken L. Chamblin posted five photos with the comment:
Here are a few pics from my trips on the Great Northern Subdivision. This bridge shown when I was traveling south and north was made in Germany and floated up the Ohio River many years before my time. It spans the Ohio River between NJ Cabin on the Ky. side and Sciotoville on the Ohio side. It's located at MP CJ 1.5 and is of serious interest to railfans.
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Ken commented on his post
 Here is a picture that was given to me. I received it as is with the side text cut off. It was a local resident to the area photo.
GScaler posted
In 1994 I caught Milwaukee Road 261 crossing the Ohio River on the CSX (former C&O) Sciotoville bridge returning from pulling the New River train. This was the last year these trains were pulled by steam and 261 was used as NKP 765 was in for a major overhaul.