Friday, August 10, 2018

Transporting Wind Turbine Parts by Ship

(Update: I've learned that these thing are supposed to be called wind turbines instead of windmills. So I fixed the title, but I can't take the time needed to fix all of the text.)

This is an extraction of the ship transport information from Transporting Windmill Parts. It was getting too big, and I wanted to isolate the info of interest to boat nerds. A disproportionate number of the ships are on the St. Lawrence Seaway because of a Facebook group I belong to. The other photos I found in Facebook crane groups.

(Update: Tower segments are also carried on the rail deck of the SS Badger ferry.)

Ports of Indiana
[I wonder if these are being imported or exported. I read about a forklift handling the big blades like "toothpicks." Judging from the men standing by the blade, the tires on this forklift are about waist high. Given that the ship has three cranes, it is interesting that a dock side crane is also being used.]

This video taught me why they needed a ground based crane even though the ship had its own cranes. It appears that the ship normally docks with its cranes on the dock side and passes the load between the cranes. But in this case the load was too long to pass between the cranes. So they docked the ship with the ship's cranes out of the way and brought in a land based crane to handle the blades.

Screenshot from a video posted by Jane Herrick
Marshract entering Duluth with wind turbines.
[It says "Amsterdam" on the stern so this would be a "salty." (It is small enough to go through the St. Lawrence Seaway.)]
Paul R Murray posted three photos, one of which is going under the Bluewater Bridges. His comment: "MUNTGRACHT - Upbound Port Huron, Michigan 5-14-2017."

1

2

3
Lynda Crothers posted three photos with the comment: "Palabora downbound passing Cape Vincent, Monday morning 9 am with wind mill blades."

Downbound is a big deal because it implies USA or Canada is exporting blades.
1

2

3
Barbara Hutt Phillips posted
Interesting! Went by Chippewa Point about ten minutes ago heading downward. Quickly grabbed my camera!


Geoff Miller posted
Carrying wind turbine parts
[I find it very depressing that American can't even build new things anymore. Instead of trying to save underground coal mining, the Feds should have subsidized windmill (and solar panel) plants in West Virginia to create jobs for coal miners.]
David Kaye posted a couple of photos of windmill blades going through the Soo Lock with the comment: "HHL Amur up bound at the West Pier of the Soo Locks. 6-17-17" Ken Janeczko posted HHL Rhine upbound near Detroit, MI carrying tower segments. I gather from the name "Rhine" that these HHL ships are importing windmill pieces from Germany.


Screenshot (source)
One of three photos posted by Bill Payne
More windmill pieces coming into the the Port of Ogdensburg on 7-7-18.
Bill Payne http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/.../wind-turbine-parts...
[At first I missed all of the blades already unloaded on the land. Tower segments must be a bulky (light) load because the bow bulb is partially out of the water even the ship is loaded.]
Four of the photos posted by John Handley:

1

2

4

5
Betsy Cook-Kelly posted two photos with the comment: "How often do you see two ships coming at you side by side at the same time?"
Blackburn Jim Never!!!
Betsy Cook-Kelly That's what I thought! I've never seen that. The funny thing was that the heavier ship with the turbine blades was going much faster than the other ship and giving off HUGE waves!
Christian Burns Was great watching it happen, the one in front pretty much pulled over and let it by!
Helen Cooper I heard the captains taking on the radio. The Amstelborg asked permission to pass around Sister Island (just East of Alex. Bay and the G3 Marquis offered to pull up a bit to let her get by.
Charles T. Low Puzzling. I imagine at least that the location near Singer Castle is a good passing zone. In front of Alexandria Bay might not be! I witnessed a freighter similarly pass a much small, slower Caribbean cruise ship once, but why one would be slower here when the speed limits are generally slower than a modern vessel's capability (aren't they?), I can't guess. On that previous occasion, the request was to "pass on two whistles" which is standard for those familiar with sound signals. The cruise ship captain took a while to figure out what was being asked of him, i.e. he needed to slow if the maneuver were to succeed - the freighter officer was very polite and patient.
Bob Gates The Amstelborg was moving I was running 22 mph took me from Clayton to Cedar point to over take here we we talking at the time how fast she was going.
Thomas LeFaivre I thought the big ships had a 6kt speed limit on the St. Lawrence.
Mark Leet Nope
Charles T. Low Mark Leet But there are speed limits, varying for different zones, clearly marked on nautical charts, sometimes varying for upbound vs. downbound vessels. I had assumed that most modern ships could achieve those speeds (up to 13 knots in some areas?) - there was a day when some of the older lakers could not - in which case why the occasion to overtake?
Mark Leet Speeds are controlled by the seaway based on several variables, some vessels don't have very much fine control, so to not go over they may have to keep 3knts below, so following such a ship for 10-12hrs can add time and $ to the journey.
Betsy Cook-Kelly That makes sense...maybe the Amstelborg wasn't actually going faster but the G3 Marquis was slowing down to let them by.
Pam Rider Rose This year it has been quite often
Brian Cameron windmill parts from Germany...

1

2
Howard Maxson commented on Betsy's posting, cropped
Passing Ogdensburg about 11: 15 am

Howard Maxson commented on Betsy's posting, cropped
Passing Ogdensburg about 11am, they must have been racing.
Four of the photos posted by John Handley:

1

2

4

5
Two of the photos posted by BigLift Shipping with the comment: "With the discharge of nacelles for the Merkur offshore wind farm in Eemshaven, The Netherlands, our grand old lady Happy Buccaneer completed her 250th voyage since she was taken into service."

1

2
GreatLakesSeaway
Longshoremen at the port were able to unload three ships within a one-week period, a first, according to OBPA officials. The ships were each carrying wind turbine components.
[It is interesting that there is no dockside track so that a ship's crane can load directly onto a railcar. ]
Bay Crane posted
The first three photos posted by Don BeVier: "Detroit, 5-18-19."
1

2

3


CarlzBoats has photos of tower segments and windmill blades going upbound on the St. Lawrence Seaway. Also a multipurpose cargo ship that includes windmill parts.

Jean Hemond Flickr of a cargo ship hauling blades. (source) Blades must be light and they could not find any cargo to haul in the hull because it is running high out of the water. Normally the bow bulb would be underwater.

No comments:

Post a Comment