Saturday, December 23, 2017

CSX/L&N Henderson Bridge across land and the Ohio River

(Bridge Hunter, no Historic Bridges, Satellite Bridge, Satellite Flood Plains)

This 1932 bridge replaces an 1885 bridge.

Dwight Cook posted
Dwight Cook I took this long ago I the it’s in Henderson Kentucky.
Don Steinhauer That is on the henderson ky side.
Don Steinhauer We painted on that for about 3 summers back in the 80s

I had noticed from the lack of development and the land scars that the Ohio River must flow over the peninsulas during a flood.
Satellite
Javid's photo below confirms that L&N had to build a long trestle across the flood plain to allow the flood waters to safely pass under the tracks.
Javid Beykzadeh posted
CSX Henderson Bridge in Rahm, IN.
Fortunately, the street-view car driver was either a bridge or a railroad fan because I don't think most people would have bothered driving on Newman Road. It is more of a gravel lane than a road.
Street View
Obviously, the tracks are on an embankment here, so the trestle doesn't go further north than this spot. The following street view shows that the trestle does continue to this embankment.
Street View, maximum resolution
USGS


"The L&N railroad bridge dedicated the last day of 1932 cost about $4 million. It replaced one erected in 1885, which at that time was the longest channel span of that type in the world." [HendersonKY History] I wonder if it is still the longest channel span in the US. I can't find where I read it today, but the bridge is 2.3 miles long.

Javid's photo indicates the trestle uses steel girders near the bridge where the bents are high. The "close-up" street view above shows that the trestle uses concrete girders when the bents are shorter and it is economical to place them closer together. A Bridge Hunter Photo captures the transition about a forth of the way from the right side of the photo. This photo confirms what I saw on the satellite image --- the spans get shorter as the bents get lower for the steel girders. I assume the depth of the steel girders decreases as the span decreases to save steel. A closeup photo of the transition The location of the transition

Ron Harper posted eight photos with the comment: "I was in Henderson Kentucky today Trestle that goes across the Ohio River."
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JP Photog posted a sequence of photos of a southbound CSX grain train starting with it going over the transition from concrete to steel girders. You can click the arrow on the right side of the photo to see more photos. Then he caught a coal train going over the steel girders.

Jim Pearson Photography caught a southbound CSX train on the trestle (source).

The following is a copy of the information provided by Tom's comments to make it easier to access the links:


4 comments:

  1. Here is a distant image showing the entire floodplain under water: https://flic.kr/p/b7RbFg

    ReplyDelete
  2. Here is a morning image of a Southbound about to start the grade segment leading to the bridge over the Ohio River: https://flic.kr/p/bq7d3w

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  3. Here are a selection of images on my Flickr page if you care to browse! :https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=42474750%40N07&sort=date-taken-desc&text=rahm&view_all=1

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the share. Just today I came across a request for photos of Chessie or C&O American cranes, so I provided him a link to your crane photo.

      Delete