Sunday, January 21, 2018

Crane load testing

I've seen several postings of waterbags and other loads being used to test cranes. I've decided to start saving them in this posting.

Headway Technology Sdn Bhd    966837-X posted several photos with the comment: "430T heavy boat lifting crane load test at North Port." This was obviously a test with "water bags."

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Note all of the fire hoses used to fill the bags.

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Looks like it took most of the day to do the testing.

A sneak peak of one of the photos of the Dynamic Beast test
See the testing of the Master Beast with 500 tons of water bags.
Hans van Vliet commented on a posting
On the testpad
Ben Stalvey posted
Manitowoc M1200R ringer based off of a M250. The largest ringer Manitowoc had built could lift 1,433 tons
[The above mentioned posting with the crane doing revenue work.]

Ben Stalvey posted
Another beast the custom Manitowoc 6000 series 2 from the Nevada Test Site.

Arthur Overdijk posted
Testing of the Manitowoc M1200R ( Hans van Vliet)
Brandon Storie posted
Mike Larson I'm thinking Pat Young or Gary Yealon. Looks like the max-load test for the M1200 RINGER. If I remember correctly, they had to round up a huge load of test weights to get enough for the lift. Was taken sometime in the mid 1990s.
Bucky Cumberland posted four photos with the comment: "Lil load test today Riley Anderson."
Mike WeaverGroup Admin 6 bags...impressive
Bucky Cumberland #411,000 
We were over a bit.....

Riley AndersonGroup Admin I love seeing this load test with the rollers floating! 😂
Bucky Cumberland We had no free board left on barge with 411,000 @76deg, let water out then went 62deg rollers floated more, then 42deg really floated then

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[They must be testing overcapacity to raise the rollers off the ring.]

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[1 degree list.]
Price Reynolds posted two photos with the comment: "I found these will looking up data for a 4600. Manitowoc 4100W Series 2 X-TENDER drawings."

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Jim Browne commented on a posting
[Unfortunately, there was no mention of the test tonnage.]
Ben Stalvey posted
Blast from the past in the Manitowoc WI Test Yard. Manitowoc 4600 ringer being tested.
Ben commented on his posting
Here is a better shot of the 4600 ringer



Manitowoc 31000 Testing



Lynn Blackstock posted
[Testing the 31000 that helped build the new football stadium in Atlanta. This would be in Manitowoc's test yard. The comments are a little contradictory, but the best I can tell is this was a 125% overload test of its maximum capacity with 5.5 million pounds (2750 tons).]
Steve Robinson posted
This one is from a crane blogger site
Manitowoc 3100 boom up undergoing testing. To give you an idea of the huge size that’s a manitowoc 2250 300 ton crane in the background.

Roger Krueger posted 12 photos of the 31000 being tested.

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Lynn Blackstock posted 40 photos of the 31000 being tested.
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(new window)  (I had to turn the volume waaaay down because I hate heavy metal.)


Manitowoc MLC300 and MLC650 Testing


Ted Jeske posted
Testing the new 685 boom for the 650
Ben StalveyGroup Admin 538 ft of main boom it looks like to me. that would be the longest ever offered
[Several people commented that the boom was too high. They were worried about a wind blowing the boom backwards and tipping the crane over. Ted responded that the whole point of testing a crane at the Manatoic test yard is to test the crane at, and even beyond, its limits.]

Ben Stalvey posted
An old shot of a MLC 650 testing in the Manitowoc WI yard.
Jim Kratzer 32 parts? [The number of times the cable goes through the block. With the short boom, short radius and big block, I'd say this was a test of the heaviest lift configuration.]
two of the four photos posted by Ben Stalvey with the comment: "Does any member on here have some pictures of the massive yellow and black 6000W that is at the Nevada Test Site? Here are the ones I have so far."
[Summarizing some comments: the 6000W S2 could lift 600 tons. The attachment increased the capacity to 1000.]

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Carlos A Garcia Sr. posted
18000 doing a test lift 300tons
Peachie Weber How much boom?
Carlos A Garcia Sr. Peachie Weber 220 ft with 80 ft mass.

Ben Stalvey posted
Okay now so who knows the operator in this 4600 series 4? Testing being done in Manitowoc WI along the Manitowoc River.
Harvard Chavis Man,,what a job that would be... Getting to work with all the new ones .. different configurations to the max... To me,,,a dream job!!!Rodney Thibodeaux notice all manitowoc test there cranes over the corner over the tracks, all other manufacturers test in front of tracks , over tracks is not a real working environment, you never put a load over tracks ,what you going to do set load down on tracks, operated crawler cranes for 28 years in offshore platform fabrication yards ,I never picked a load off my tracks and set it back down on tracks ,we always test load in front of tracks ,Arthur Zuehlke Yes. Testing on the corners was not meant to mislead or inflate the capability of the crane. Lots of testing at Manitowoc went beyond the "working environment". Recall structures built over the crawlers to allow lifts nearly up against the rotating frame of the machine. All this was done just to learn what the machine could do in extremes and ID any problems with modeling /design/welds / etc.
Bill Elmore commented on Ben's post
Inspected one today on the shores of the Arctic Ocean at Prudhoe Bay , Alaska

Ben Stalvey posted
Testing of a Manitowoc 4600 series 4 in Manitowoc WI
Dennis Dorton Great pic using up all the chart and then some.
Cecil Douglas Had them on their toes a lot. Great beast. Love um.
Frank Keeney Only operated one 4600 lift crane. The others were all draglines. They were a beast.

Ben Stalvey posted
M 250 Xspander the early VPC Max
Ben Stalvey The massive M1200R ringer can be seen to the right.
Ted Fortier Ben Stalvey how many were built? One and a half in that pic.
Roderick Arpin nice shot of the old test yard,above and to left was assembly/shipping lot for the self erect units - enjoyed watching them load..back in the day..............
Zubert Ferrell Talk about some tail swing on that big girl.... she'll wipe out half the jobsite with that big booty!!!! Lol
Chuck Valind Zubert Ferrell an engineer hit another engineers motorcycle while first testing in manitowoc.

Testing the two extremes of boom length for the 888.
Ben Stalvey posted two photos with the comment: "Manitowoc 888 with open throat top. Shots taken in 1995."
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290 ft of boom 75,930 lb @ 46

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70 ft boom max load lift of 460,640lbs at 15 degree radius
[The comments indicate that it is probably an 85-degree radius.]


(new window)  Starting at 11:07 they show testing an overload alarm. First they lift the test weights. Then at 11:21, they measure the radius to verify that they have the correct radius for the load being lifted. Then at 11:29, they use their bodies to add additional weight to the load. We see the overload alarm light up at 11:30 a few times as they push the weights down a few times. I always thought of weight sensing and overload alarms as a computer control capability. But this shows they figured out how to do it at least by 1929, Back then, they not only did not have computers, electronics in general would be bleeding edge technology. Or did they invent a mechanical solution to determine radius and weight and "compute" the safety of the lift?


There are several photos of a ringer being tested at Olmsted Dam.

Testing the ALE SK350, the worlds largest capacity, land-based crane.

Cranes should be tested in an area that is big enough that the boom can fall in any direction and not hit any buildings, cars, etc. Kobleco's plant in Takasago tested a 1,250 tonne 16000 J-H crawler crane too close to some buildings and killed at least two men.      Manitowoc killed three men during a test, but I have not been able to find any details about what went wrong.

<to be written: tower crane test>

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