Friday, August 26, 2016

Some farming firsts

This list of five firsts is from the perspective of CNH (Case, International Harvester, Ford and New Holland) so you won't see items like the first self-scouring steel plow (John Deere) or the first live (independent) PTO in 1946. (Cockshutt hired two engineers from Oliver so that they could scoop Oliver by 6 months.) I normally provide a link for my source, but it looks like the URL is not permanent. (Update, the link is working again.)

Sperry New Holland launches the first self-propelled forage harvester in 1961
International Harvester introduces the revolutionary Axial-Flow combine in 1977. ​This greatly improves harvesting efficiency through its revolutionary rotor design
​​​​New Holland invents the first self-tying pick-up baler in 1940.
​A part of New H​olland Agriculture history​: the first mass produced tractor, the Fordson Model F, is built in 1917.
​​Case produces the first steam-powered tractor in 1869. ​​
Because the pictures might be temporary, I'm saving the other three they posted.

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6
Update:
Horsepower posted
Some of the video links they posted about the announcement: 8:00 min, 2:26 min, 2:27 min, 2:24 min. A web page about driverless technology. They do expect farmers to build private paths on their farm so that it can get from the barn to the fields.
CaseIH "high-efficiency farming" topics other than autonomous tractors.


And a Massey-Ferguson "rebuttle," 3:15 min.

Massey-Ferguson's review of their history: 4:07 min

Another CNH video: 8:00. Starting at 6:10, it presents some history. At 6:12 is "grampa's" baler.

A Facebook posting where the comments discuss which year the another manufactures introduced their axial rotor design, including:
Justin Hiner Jared, Case never built a rotary, International did. Sam, international wasn't behind everyone else as tractor house will show you. New Holland had rotaries on the market in 1975, Gleaner in 1976, International in 1977, White in 1978, John Deere in 1998.
Linda Chamberlain White was in 1979, but marketed in 1980.




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