Saturday, September 23, 2017

Transporting Wind Turbine Parts

(Update: I've learned that these thing are supposed to be called wind turbines instead of windmills. So I fixed the title, but I can't take the time needed to fix all of the text.)

(Update: transporting windmill parts on a ship has been moved to its own post because this one was getting too big. And staging windmill parts in a railyard in East Peoria also has its own post.   Hauling two nacelles on 8-axle flatcars)

It is not only big business building the huge windmills in a modern windmill farm, transporting the parts to build them is also a big business.

John W. Coke shared 183 photos of taking long blades up a windy mountain road and through towns. Fortunately, the share is to a public group so that you can access the photos yourself.

The peninsula that Manitowoc Engineering used when they started as a ship building company now holds a company that makes windmill tower segments. That company sometimes ships the segments on barges on the Great Lakes.

It was the most popular topic in my Interesting Unit Trains posting, so I have moved those photos and videos to here.




Frank Lenny Smith posted
Pointe-Claire, QC, Sept 13,2017
Below isn't a unit train, but it is so strongly related to the above video that I include it here. It contains the other parts of wind turbines.






This train uses three flat cars for every two blades.

Joe Zeller posted
I caught this propeller train on 8/16/16. The bridge is the entrance to the Port of Indiana. Not sure how long the Burns Harbor yard was storing this but it's the second time I've seen it. The first time was a "run through" on the CN in Griffith.

John W. Coke posted
Wind farm blades
[Notice how they are held almost vertical because they are too wide to lay flat. Holding them on a slight diagonal reduces their vertical clearence.]
John W. Coke copied another photo of a block of "blade cars."



"On the emporia sub in Gardner at Clare crossing @ 2:39 pm on 8-20-17. Was out on the emporia sub with another railfanner out of view. A train was coming and just barely got it and I noticed some huge parts on it. Now I've never seen these parts before and so I had to ask a facebook group what they were and they told me they were generators and turbines for the windmill blades. Forgive the video in the beginning for lack of focus"
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Andrew Aguilar posted pictures of a train of windmill turbines. (The "house" that turns on top of the tower to which the propeller hub attaches.)

John W. Coke posted
Windmill generators
[Notice that four, instead of the usual two, trucks are needed to hold this load. When you consider that two trucks can hold 286,000 pounds or 243 tons, it puts in perspective the kinds of loads cranes have to lift to build the windmills.]


Jesse Elser posted seven photos of a crane in a lay down yard. Unlike the cranes that build the towers, these cranes need to be tall, but they are still heavy lift. Look at the size of the hook.
Ben StalveyGroup Admin Little 14000 short and stought
Ken Wright Was there on Monday to unload. RJ Corman doing the unloading at the Watco yard.

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Ben StalveyGroup Admin Them towers I don't think are here from Manitowoc WI
Jesse Elser We brought our tower from Brandon, SD
Ben StalveyGroup Admin Locally these bases are made here in Manitowoc WI. Just not yours guess.
Jesse Elser I've never been to that plant but there are also plants in Newton Iowa and Clinton Illinois for them. The GE ones

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Two MLC 165 cranes tandem loading 12 wind-tower segments into a barge


Ben Stalvey posted six photos with the comment:
This job done by Trans-Link of Manitowoc WI was featured in several crane magazines. Even in the Manitowoc Looking up magazine. Working in tandem two Manitowoc MLC 165 cranes were used operated by Pat Siehr and Troy Flentje. To load these wind tower section made by BroadWind Of Manitowoc WI on to barges. Often times one does not realize water transportation is a good option. Saves on oversize load permits, Escorts, Fuel Costs etc. Trans-Link has a great team always up for a challenge. They run this dock here in Manitowoc WI
Noah Kiel Still cost 76,000 from here to St. Louis.
The comments also have a couple of videos.

I assume the segments were made by Broadwind Towers. It is nice to see that Manitowoc's old shipbuilding/crane manufacturing facilities got reused after Manitowoc moved south of town. It will be interesting how the southern facilities are reused now that crane assembly has been moved to Shady Grove, PA.

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Update:
Scfreenshot
See how Mcfadyens from Scotland makes a 90 degrees right turn with a 60 metres blade with railings on both sides on the bridge. Great to see the possibilities of the SWC Super Wing Carrier. Without, it is almost impossible to do such a transport. More information about the Super Wing Carrier: https://www.nooteboom.com/trailers/super-wing-carrier/…
Tim Keeler Nooteboom makes some really nice trailers.

UP article about wind distribution centers
Gary Swain shared Mike Bags's photo
Two Local17 crane operators unloading wind turbine parts. Trip8&9 [Manitowoc 888 and 999].
Gary Swain There's 36 new turbines going up in Chautauqua county NY, town of Arkwright.
Gary Swain shared Mike Bags' Wind turbine laydown yard. I selected some of the the photos that show the two cranes have to pick up a tower segment and then walk it to a far corner of a 1400' by 500' storage lot. They will be doing dozens of tandem picks to store all of the tower segments. He expects to be employed all winter. The blades don't weigh much, but they are 180' long.

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[Note the crawler tracks of each crane are pointed in the same direction as they haul the segment across the storage lot. In the left background you can see they have already moved one segment into storage.]
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[I never noticed the cradles that are attached to the flat cars until I saw this photo.]
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[Much better exposure.]
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[Back for another one. But in this case the cradle stays with the segment.]
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[I assume they are parked for the night.]
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We have to walk the puppies all the way over there.
Richard W Robinson posted
A little crawl action
[I wonder if this is the same laydown yard as the above or if there is another big project in progress.]
Randy Griggs posted two photos with the comment: "Wind turbine work in 2009."
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John W. Coke posted two photos with the comment: "Wind turbine blade transport."

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John W. Coke posted three photos.
Wim Kimpe if you negociate the signalisation car at the back, this is the result. This happened some weeks ago in Germany. The driver survived, but was seriously injured.
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 Notice the green frame behind the two "orange men" under the blade. That was the dolly that was supporting the blade. But a significant part of the blade extends past the dolly. When the blade turns like this, that extended part turns into the next lane. The "oversize load" escort car that was behind the blade should have been in the outside lane because the blade was overhanging into that lane. The comment implies that the driver of the wrecked truck went around the escort car and thus it not only rammed into the blade, it shoved it further down the road so that it was then overhanging the lanes in the other direction as well.

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Screenshot (source)
Screenshot (source)

Mike Six posted
Good Morning!
Night shift unloading trains. Fun fun fun!
Bay Crane posted
[More tower segments being stockpiled.]
I learned of this Siemens plant because it was near a UP derailment on BNSF's former Santa Fe route. It is rather obvious from the satellite image that they make blades and that being able to ship by rail is important.
Satellite (source was a comment in a posting)

Daniel Fredrickson posted some photos with the comment: "BCOL 4611 leads a westbound windmill train through Princeton late this afternoon [3-23-2018]."

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(new window)

John Kujawa posted two photos:
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[hubs and nacelles]

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The local newspaper finally wrote about these parts for 106 windmills. It has three photos. 900 semi-truck loads to transport the parts to Walnut Ridge Wind Farm in north-central Bureau County. They will move two turbines a day between 2-5am with an agreement for the two convoys to be clear of the East Peoria city limits by 6am. "Each turbine requires nine trucks to move: four pieces of the tower, three blades, one hub and one generator that powers each unit. The blades are each 204 feet long. The generator weights 258,000 pounds and requires a 13-axle truck to move."

David Jordan shared the above article.
Jordan Graves I guess TP&W is done with windmill trains.
David JordanDavid and 4 others manage the membership, moderators, settings, and posts for Peoria Illinois Railroads Trains & Shortlines. Jordan Graves Wind TURBINE trains. They just received a blade train from Union Pacific at Watseka late Wednesday and moved it (or part of it) to a siding east of Monticello by Thursday morning. So it appears GE Wind is still leasing space at the Hoosierlift for component storage. When components now stored at TZPR are removed, there will be room for more tower and hub/nacelle trains. I doubt they have enough material for 106 towers yet.






DeBruler
Tod Riebow shared

Daniel Leduc commented on Tod's posting
Wind mill tower section !!!
Jens Hadel posted
Liebherr LR 11000 with Sennebogen 5500
John W. Coke posted
Vestas Wind Systems, turbine.
John W. Coke posted
J & L Contracting LLC. hauling a wind turbine nacelle

John Menges posted
eastbound windmill component train at Watseka this afternoon
[Note there is room to put a third hub in the middle of the flat cars. But that would probably exceed their weight limit.]
John W. Coke posted two photos with the comment: "Wind turbine parts."
[Obviously, tower segments.]
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Cleveland Crane and Shovel Sales posted (source) four photos with the comment:

🚧Windfarm parts offload🚧-Manitowoc 999💪🏼-These turbines will be among the largest land base wind farm components to be erected in the USA😱-These vestas turbines have only been used in offshore applications until now👍🏻

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Bay Crane posted
in Westfield, Pennsylvania.
Steve White I saw 60 Blades on Barges on the Mississippi River while in New Orleans a while ago. How long are the blades and what does one blade cost ??
Steve White Sorry, I answered my own question on google...For a 1.5-MW turbine, typical blades should measure 110 ft to 124 ft (34m to 38m) in length, weigh 11,500 lb/5,216 kg and cost roughly $100,000 to $125,000 each. Rated at 3.0 MW, a turbine's blades are about 155 ft/47m in length, weigh about 27,000 lb/12,474 kg and are valued at roughly $250,000 to $300,000 each...

David S Dockstader posted   at Erie Sand & Gravel Co.The Happy River
William Gray delivering wind turbines
Mark Gilson interesting how the semis look like toys in this perspective

Neil Ruddy posted five photos with the comment: "Derailment spills windmills at Avon, IA yard."

It appears to me that something stopped the truck of the front flat car with so much force that it stopped the front flatcar so quickly that its load slid off and the flatcar behind it rode on top of the front flatcar. But I have no idea what could stop a truck with that much force.
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Sam Carlson posted
Oversize Load!
[Look how wide the trailer is. It looks like it occupies both lanes of a highway.]


Screenshot


(new window)   "TP&W windmill blade train going east at Watseka on Sunday 16 September 2018. These are the really long windmill blades that stretch across 3 flatcars. Video taken from the Iroquois Federal parking lot between 4th and 5th streets."


Video of transporting the parts via ship and truck.

Video of two hubs being transported by truck. I don't have a fancy phone, but I understand that they can take a video with a horizontal format. A profile video drives me nuts unless the subject is a crane. The trailer has a significant distance between its two axles. I've seen that on some trailers that haul crane counterweights. It seems to me that the front axle would get most of the load.

A train full of windmill towers.

12 photos of a windmill blade train.

12 photos of a train that includes more tower segments. These seem to be coming from a different direction, and thus I assume supplier, than some of the other tower segment trains we have seen. The comments include a discussion of TP&W interchanging with CSX at Lafayette instead of Reynolds.

Probably a drone view of a blade train on Lake State Railway by Bay City, MI.(source)









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