Sunday, April 10, 2016

IH: Chicago, West Pullman & Southern

David Daruszka posted the following two pictures with the comment:

Chicago, West Pullman & Southern traces its history to the 1880’s and the growth of Chicago industry. Cyrus McCormick, having founded International Harvester, wanted to grow his business by also controlling his suppliers. High grade Steel was vital to the production of the “reaper”, Harvester’s primary product.
As a part of that strategy, McCormick gained control of the predecessor of Wisconsin Steel, located in South Chicago. The Chicago, West Pullman and Southern Railroad was founded by McCormick, to transport steel between Wisconsin Steel and Harvester’s plants.
Any remaining steel production was sold to McCormick’s good friend, George Pullman, who ran the huge Pullman Works on Chicago’s South Side. A reliable and controllable Railroad was needed to economically provide timely deliveries, so the Chicago West Pullman and Southern Railroad was born and built to serve these two 19th century giants.
In 1983, Chicago West Pullman LLC was formed and bought the Chicago West Pullman & Southern from the bankrupt estate of Wisconsin Steel, which had been spun off by Harvester and left to flounder.
1

2
Bob Lalich commented on the above posting
Here is a CWP&S map circa 1915, courtesy of the Southeast Chicago Historical Society collection. West Pullman was quite an industrial area at the time.
[North is on the left side.]
Paul Petraitis also commented
Here ya go...West Pullman in 1892, industrial park west of Halsted, workers housing east to Normal Ave, fancy shmantzy houses east of Normal aka Stewart Ridge, built amidst the rolling hills of Andrews' Woods...West Pullman got the ICRR to build their Blue Island Branch through town ...the Calumet Electric St Ry ran west from Michigan Avenue along the northern edge of town as far as Morgen (1000 W)
David provided a link for a late-1900's real estate brochure published by the West Pullman Land Association.

Paul Petraitis It looks like they began putting this project together about 1890...chose the name because of the great reputation the Pullman name had at that time...the crash of 1894 hurt everybody AND the Pullman Strike of May 18904 kinda made the Pullman name "box office poison" for many....

Their South Deering Yard was just north of Wisconsin Steel. CWP&S used to have the Irondale Yard.

Update:
Steve OConnor posted
Interlake Inc: Locomotive No. 11 Engine Replacement (IK Photo-Dr. Raymond Boothe Collection)
Kam Miller Almost looks like the shops of the Chicago, West Pullman & Southern.
Kam Miller posted
Kam's comment:
This is another line I was partial to back in the day. Loved those red and white locos as I would see them in transfer use at the IC Homewood yard while taking the old rattan-seat single deck mu's to Chicago. I got some decals from a South Holland hobby shop that moved to Wisconsin and made a couple CWP locos myself.
Kam Miller posted
Note in the first photo it is moving slag cars. A reminder that it was an industrial railroad to serve Wisconsin Steel and IH's Plano Works.

Mike Rusnak Got a ride on one those back in the 60's. Was working the IH plant near 121st and Racine.

Dennis DeBruler Mike Rusnak, what did they make at that IH plant? Was it where there is now a field of solar panals?

Mike Rusnak The West Pullman International Harvester plant made a lot of bearings, engine, axle and transmission parts. I worked there for awhile in the mid 70's and my mom worked there during WWII making bomb components. Haven't been back there in many years. Front of the plant was along 120th and ran from Racine to Peoria. The back fronted the Blue Island branch of the ICRR electric line.


Keith Rieger Sr. commented on above posting
 Blue Island about 1974
Bill Molony posted
Chicago, West Pullman & Southern Railroad 0-6-0 #25 was steamed up and ready for a day's work when this photograph was taken on April 18, 1939.
Bob Lalich I believe the only CWP&S roundhouse was located at the south end of their 100th St Yard. It was accessed with switches rather than a turntable.


"In 1902 Deering merged with the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company to form the giant International Harvester Company. Deering owned the Wisconsin Steel Works on the Calumet River, and, by 1924, International Harvester operated at nine different sites throughout Chicago. (The Chicago River An illustrated History and Guide to the River and Its Waterways, 2nd Edition, 2006, David M. Solzman, p.81)

Marty posted three pictures, each with a different paint scheme, to a public group.

Sam Carlson posted a couple of pictures of their engines in a blue and white scheme.

Bob Lalich provided a Flickr album of engines.



No comments:

Post a Comment