Tuesday, January 10, 2017

US-52 over Mississippi River

(Bridge Hunter, Historic BridgesBridge Hunter ReplacementSatellite (18 photos including pier construction for the replacement), John Weeks III)
(Update: a Facebook page dedicated to the history of this bridge. (source))
Chcuk Edmonson posted
Summer, 1932. The partially finished Savanna Sabula Toll Bridge over the Mississippi.

Bridge Hunter indicates it was built in 1932 and rehabilitated in 1985. Even though it was posted to the National Register of Historic Places on August 27, 1999, its replacement is being constructed. The bridge is free to anyone who will move it someplace else. But you don't toss that into the back of a pickup truck.

Historic Bridges says this continuous truss bridge is in good shape but the reason it is being replaced is that the lanes are too narrow. Since the replacement is being built right next to it, then they should have built a new bridge to carry one direction of traffic and allow this one to remain for the other direction of traffic.

Update:
Jerry Jackson posted
C44-9W 5325 leads her train under the Sabula Bridge, entering Savanna, IL, summer of 2013.
Jerry Jackson posted
This eastbound train is entering North Savanna, IL, passing under the bridge to Sabula, IA. The bridge crosses over the Mississippi River. Summer of 2013.
Todd Cornilsen I'll miss that bridge....
[So the new arch bridge is not going to add lanes, it is going to destroy the old bridge.]

Rusty Sanders posted six photos with the comment: "Manitowoc MLC-300 VPC MAX setting the 1st arch piece on the Savanna/Sabula bridge. Savanna Illinois. 137,000 gross wt."

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Jeff Tomlinson posted
A new 300 working on a new bridge across the Mississippi. Sublua-Savana [sic.].
Rusty Sanders posted
MLC-300 VPCMAX Getting some! Setting arch ribs on the New Savanna Illinois Mississippi River bridge. "Big Iron" Ben at the helm... Photo taken out of the side window of my American 9310. Notice the boom angle indicator in the lower right corner.
Rusty Sanders In that configuration it is good for 160,000 lb at 160 ft
Rusty Sanders 105,000 lbs. at 148' radius..
tom Nugent posted
Bridge job, Savanna Illinois/ Sabula Iowa Mississippi River Bridge. Manitowoc MLC300.
Dave Morse Can any operators tell me, does it affect capacity of a crane, such as the above, while working off a barge, I've only operated rough terrain rigs with 70 ton capacity, had a chance too break in on 180 ton Loraine friction machine, but was to young and stupid to take the opportunity!!!
[Unfortunately, no one answered. Lifts like this where the boom is along the long axis of the barge and there is plenty of barge under the boom don't concern me. But I have seen other pictures were they are lifting off the side of the barge.]


Cranesy
When the Manitowoc MLC300 crawler crane debuted with Variable Position Counterweight (VPC) and VPC-MAX heavy lift attachment, one of its unique selling points was the crane’s barge-lifting capabilities. The reduced footprint and floating counterweight meant that it would be much more efficient for lifters to barge-mount a crawler crane. Contracting teams could erect the crane onto smaller water-based barges because the machine automatically adjusts its center of gravity for each lift.
The MLC300 is now erected on a barge in the Mississippi River measuring 70 ft by 195 ft. It’s lifting 76 USt arch rib sections to a height of 165 ft using 295 ft of main boom, all from a 100 ft radius. To meet the lift radius and pick weight requirements on the job, Kraemer’s MLC300 had to be outfitted with its optional VPC-MAX attachment, which enhances the crane’s capacity and enables additional boom and jib length combinations.
JJ Novak posted
Kraemer North America is replacing an 84-year-old truss bridge, the 2,482 ft (757 m)-long Savanna-Sabula Bridge near Savanna, Illinois, using a barge-mounted Manitowoc MLC300 equipped with VPC-MAX, hired from Dawes Rigging & Crane Rental (Dawes), a member of the ALL Family of Companies.
Note: this is from July.


Roger Husband caught a BNSF train approaching the north side of the truss bridge. You can see some of the new piers under the truss.

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