Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Cranes in Action (UP builds a bridge in 7 days)

I was going to post about the UP bridge. But I came across a couple of other interesting builds soon after. So I generalized the topic and I'll add to this blog posting as I come across more Facebook postings.

(Update: there is too much interesting info in this posting to summarize. I verified with an incognito window that, even though it is a closed group, you can access it if you have a Facebook login.)

Donnavan Kelly posted nine pictures with the comment:
Utah Nevada border, emergency wash out on union Pacific rail road, double main line... Allen engeneering as general contractor , mountain crane 2250( first class outfit!) 330 ton, 140 boom, walking on top uppr pre cast Rr bridge, reaching out driving 14x89 180 foot h pile at 125 feet out....... Correct me if I'm wrong but from what we have gathered its the first time a crane this size has been used on this designed bridge as a working tressle? Start to finish 7 days....
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9

Liz Watson Brown posted
Mountain Cranes Manitowoc 2250
[I assume this is also of the UP repair.]
The UP now has at least three routes that cross the Utah/Nevada border: UP's, Western Pacific's, and Southern Pacific's South and North. Of these, it looks like Loray Wash did not have a big enough culvert to handle the flow and the UP embankment became a dam until it broke. I wonder when UP put the second track back in.

The railroads have abandoned so many routes that now there is no redundancy in the system. This not only reduces our export revenues, it gives other countries a chance to "steal our business." For example, China is exporting more corn because we can't send enough.


2250 lifting a truck crane on top of a building


Aaron Payne posted two photos with the comment: "2250 with Glenn Peer Sr putting up my Grove to top out the building few years back. Great job because it was freezing that winter and no office or safety people ever came up!"

1

2

888 joining a MLC165 for a tandom pick


Beard Mason posted six photos with the comment: "The mighty 888 tracking down to meet up with mlc165 for a some tandem picks."

1

2

3

4

5

6

Adding a 200k ton module to a plant


Charlie Trevino posted two photos with the comment: "Another 200k going up!" I've noticed that building refineries has become like building ships. They build modules on the ground and then use big cranes to lift them in place.

1
2
Jason Rico commented on the above photo
Jason Rico commented on the above photo
93% get u some[224500/240400 = .93]

Two MLC 165 cranes tandem loading 12 wind-tower segments into a barge


Ben Stalvey posted six photos with the comment:
This job done by Trans-Link of Manitowoc WI was featured in several crane magazines. Even in the Manitowoc Looking up magazine. Working in tandem two Manitowoc MLC 165 cranes were used operated by Pat Siehr and Troy Flentje. To load these wind tower section made by BroadWind Of Manitowoc WI on to barges. Often times one does not realize water transportation is a good option. Saves on oversize load permits, Escorts, Fuel Costs etc. Trans-Link has a great team always up for a challenge. They run this dock here in Manitowoc WI
Noah Kiel Still cost 76,000 from here to St. Louis.
The comments also have a couple of videos.

I assume the segments were made by Broadwind Towers. It is nice to see that Manitowoc's old shipbuilding/crane manufacturing facilities got reused after Manitowoc moved south of town. It will be interesting how the southern facilities are reused now that crane assembly has been moved to Shady Grove, PA.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Miscellaneous


Flying through the air posting, cropped


Crash landing posting, cropped
Larry Arthur Hoerres posted
This is serious pic you don't see this everyday this was several years ago its got the most cranes on one pic in all the world
Willie Cromwell 4000's and 4100's
Joe Leonard And just think - not one computer. An actual human had to string a tape and look at a load chart. And nobody on a cell phone. Must be magic.
David Beard Yes Joe, the generation coming up now couldn't handle this.
Shawn Douglas commented on the above posting
Shawn Douglas commented on the above posting, not Manitowocs
Jim Browne commented on the above posting
Anne Bouffard Bern posted
Rich Reiter That's the first MR415 ever built.
Dennis DeBruler commented on the above posting
The site line to the left of the building goes from the end of the lock wall, south of River East Center, and over the roof of Embassy Suites. The site line to the right goes from the side of 403 N Water, north of 400 N McClurg Ct., north of Loews, and north of a black building that has evidently been built south of Illinois between Park and Columbus.So it was taken from 225 E Grand Ave., and it is in the vacant lot south of Illinois between Park and New Street.That whole area was (relatively) low-rise industrial as recently as the 1970s: http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/.../ogden-slip-and...
Robert Hansen posted
3 Mani's at Gove NT Aust. 18000,2250,M250. 2006.
James Vaughn posted four pictures of Manitowocs at the Holcim cement plant in Ste. Genevieve, MO.

`1

2

3

4
Ben Stalvey shared
Checkout this Bigge MLC 650 with VPC Max
[I wonder what kind of plant it is helping to build.]
Screenshot
Austin Tuck posted
Austin Tuck Yes one 650 the other is a 300! Middletown NY last fall.
]Lomma[
Andre Tardif posted
BUFFALO NY
[On the CB&Q, welders cut the legs at the top and they lifted just the bridge to the side. Then they worked on the legs.]
Larry Arthur Hoerres posted
Mike Keilen I get the pick and travel, but why all the jibs? Where and when was this?Ed Flores Don't know about this one but the ones I did were in McDermott's yard in Amelia Louisiana. All yard cranes were equipped with jibs no point in removing them. All picks were at 60% of chart.

Screenshot, -:021
A video of building a Liebherr with a weight wagon. The luffer is as long as the boom. No comment indicated the model or dimensions.

Jesse Leight posted a couple of photos that explains a video he posts later.

1   Estimated weight was around 15 million pounds..... Give or take... Used the twin 18000's to give her just a lil tilt and let gravity do the rest..... 
2, cropped    2 18000's do the main lift and a 16000 is the staging crane


The video of the tandom lift to launch the boat. I wonder what the thing on top of the bow is.

Dean McCartney shared
[I finally noticed the foundation with the bolts on the left side of the picture. So they are going to tilt it up, then swing it between them to place it over the foundation. It looks like the one in the foreground is going to have to travel as well as swing.]
Joe Lizotte posted four pictures with the comment: "This was a cool day picking our 60 ton RT with a gmk 7550 out of a historical church in Phoenix Arizona." The comments indicated they were lucky because they were supposed to rig to the outrigger boxes instead of the tie-down lugs.

1
2

3
4
posted

posted
Ben Stalvey posted
Another beast the custom Manitowoc 6000 series 2 from the Nevada Test Site.
[Our taxpayer money paid for some custom built cranes to help clean up the bomb test site.]
Dean McCartney posted
Found this on line. There is a Manitowoc in the picture but I don't know what that big sucker is there putting together.
Todd Kelafant That is a Lampsons 4600 ringer ...Assembling a Caterpillar 8200 dragline !!!
Jay Wilson Uses the TriStructure from Marion but has the tall mast portion from Bucyrus. Then Cat takes credit.
[Unfortunately, I don't know what "TriStructure" means.]
Terex Cranes shared
Great job with a CC 2400-1
posted
Double team
Gregg Tullos posted
New Orleans floodwall 2012 !
[I remember posting another "forest of cranes" photo working on a floodwall down in LA, but I can't find it now.]
Nick Salvatore posted
#CapitalCity getting it done on the Downcomer project at US Steel in Detroit, MI! #16000.
Joe Lizotte posted two photos with the comment: "2250 in a copper smelter."
1
2

Mike Lewellyn posted, more like "crane inaction"
[Fortunately, no one was hurt. The boom went backwards on a MLC650. To summarize the comments, it was probably a combination of high winds and not using mats on soft ground.]
For the Love of Tractors posted
Hey look at that Panther!
David Sells What's up with the Manitowoc ?
For the Love of Tractors Hit a sink hole while putting up a windmill
Randall Feinen For the Love of Tractors I knew it would be a windmill fail.
[ Mats probably would not have helped since it was a sinkhole instead of soft ground.]
Tyler James posted three photos with the comment: "Windmill work. I hope they're ok." This one fell forward instead of backwards. Ida Grove IA in 2015 or 2016.
Steven Haring Yup the unpinned counterweights is what is the worst part about this situation, ya your not supposed to turn them over but shit happens and tons of steel not strapped down isn't a good thing. [I had noticed the counterweights had fallen off their platform in this wreck. Note that in the above Indiana wreck the counterweight stack remained intact.]

1

2

3
Aaron Walters commented on Tyler's posting
Michael Angelo Someone got lazy and didn't feel like moving the mats.Tha Ropers Barefootn again, O' well.
[I'd say the mats were needed, crosswise.]


Tyler James posted five photos with the comment: "CONRAC Chicago IL." They are placing precast floor segments. The segments look like the ones used to build the parking garage where I worked.

1

2

3

4
5

Tyler James posted two photos with the comment: "Copper smelting facility in Globe, AZ."
Dave Ochoa That was the heat exchanger we set.

1
2

Dave Ochoa commented on the above posting
[Dave Ochoa got a picture of Tyler James "putting in the shafts for the new scrubbing facility." So Taylor took pictures of Dave's operation while Dave took pictures of Taylor's operation.]
Mammoet South posted six photos with the comment: "M16000"

1

2

3

4

5

6
Screenshot, putting out a gas-well fire.
There are a lot of comments about the operator being bad because he let it swing and hit the well head.
Jimmy Schexnayder If he dropped the extinguisher device on the well head and damaged it, it could have been impossible to cap the well. Also, the swishing sound at the end is the release of Nitrogen Gas to displace the Oxygen, extinguishing the fire.
John McCarth posted
2250 flying steel Boston
Ben Stalvey Awesome don't see that often anymore
Ben Stalvey shared two photos ("‪PHOTO UPDATE: the last blue tub girder on the Zoo Int project has been set in the core of the interchange.") and posted two more as comments. I learned a new term: "tub girder."

1

2

comment

comment
Michael Wallace added the comment:
Man, those cranes sure move quick from point a to point b.
zooic.org, cropped
Finally, some information on what it takes to transport one of the bigger cranes. When it walks the nacelle over to the windmill tower at 3:34, it is so top heavy that it amazes me that the ground remains level enough that the crane doesn't tilt over.The animation doesn't show any mats being used.



I do not like how this video was edited because it I could not figure out where it lifted the roof from and how it was moving it into position over the building. My best guess is that the roof was built on the side and the crane just turned.

In this video you can see that the crane turns and moves forward with a weight wagon.

A posting with a couple of photos using a weight wagon.

There are a bunch of pictures of different projects in this posting, but they don't provide much detail. Ben did another "call for activity."

323 photos from the last open house in Manitowoc, WI.

My pictures of a Manitowoc 777 crane at the Brandon Lock.

No comments:

Post a Comment