Monday, February 27, 2017

Early Electric Motors and Alternators

John Abbott posted
Westinghouse factory workers
Randall Thompson commented on the above posting
This is a Westinghouse generator from about 1910, in the Ames Power Station near Telluride Colorado. Over to the right side in the picture, there appears to be similar units under construction.

John Abbott posted
James Miller Direct-driven compressor (Dynamo) 128 pole or as few as 16 poles. (1880)

John Abbott posted
Can_factory_workers_crimping_on_can_ends,_published_1909
[This looks like a line-shaft driven machine that was converted to electric power by having the motor turn the belt pulley.]
John Abbott posted
Matt A Kutz shared
Paul Maciulaitis image title is Woman at BASF gas engine power house in 1917
[The comments point out that it looks like the alternator is turning fast because of a slow shutter speed. The woman is holding a pose while the picture is being taken. The wheel of that size is probably turning at 60-80 rpm. An example of a large, slingle-crank gas engine.]

Jeff Mullier posted four pictures with the comment:
Some pages that may be of interest from a 1928 Metropolitan Vickers book "The Trafford Park Works of the Metropolitan-Vickers Electrical Company Ltd, Manchester".
1

2

3

4


Fairbanks-Morse also made alternators as well as engines.

Western Electric made alternators as well as phones.

1907 alternators were installed when the MWRD Powerhouse was built.





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