Tuesday, July 5, 2022

1932-2013 Royal Gorge Incline Railway next to Royal Gorge Bridge

(Bridge HunterSatellite, it is lost in the shadows)

There was an incline railroad down to the Hanging Bridge in the Royal Gorge next to the suspension bridge. The railroad closed in 2013 because of a fire.

Boston Public Library Flickr via Bridge Hunter and BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

Panorama of the Royal Gorge, Colo., one of the world's greatest chasms, showing the world's steepest incline railway and the world's highest bridge.

File name: 06_10_014265

Title: Panorama of the Royal Gorge, Colo., one of the world's greatest chasms, showing the world's steepest incline railway and the world's highest bridge.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Bridges; Mountains; Sports & recreation facilities

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions


Boston Public Library Flickr via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

Scenic incline from the bottom of the Royal Gorge, Colo.

File name: 06_10_014316

Title: Scenic incline from the bottom of the Royal Gorge, Colo.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Mountains; Sports & recreation facilities

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions


Boston Public Library Flickr, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

Upper Station Incline Railway at the Royal Gorge showing one of the cars.

File name: 06_10_014245

Title: Upper Station Incline Railway at the Royal Gorge showing one of the cars.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Sports & recreation facilities

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions


1994 Photo by Geoff Hubbs via BridgeHunter, License: Released into public domain

1929,1984 Royal Gorge Bridge 955' (291m) over Arkansas River west of Canon City, CO

(Bridge Hunter; Satellite)

"World's Highest Bridge 1929-2001" [HighestBridges]

The main span is 938.2' with a total length of 1,260'. This 0:08 video from a train in the gorge was the motivation for this research.

Boston Public Library Flickr via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

The world's highest bridge, spanning the top of the Royal Gorge.

File name: 06_10_014250

Title: The world's highest bridge, spanning the top of the Royal Gorge.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Bridges; Rivers; Mountains

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions


Boston Public Library Flickr via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

Diesel streamline train at bottom of the Royal Gorge along the Arkansas River near Canon City, Colorado.

File name: 06_10_014273

Title: Diesel streamline train at bottom of the Royal Gorge along the Arkansas River near Canon City, Colorado.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Bridges; Rivers; Mountains

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions



Boston Public Library Flickr via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

Suspension bridge over the Royal Gorge, Colo.

File name: 06_10_014246

Title: Suspension bridge over the Royal Gorge, Colo.

Date issued: 1930 - 1945 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 print (postcard) : linen texture, color ; 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

Genre: Postcards

Subject: Bridges; Rivers; Mountains

Notes: Title from item.

Collection: The Tichnor Brothers Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: No known restrictions


p923 of 1930-06-05 Engineering News-Record

Of note in the above plans is the anchorage, a very important part of the design of a suspension bridge because of all of the tension in the cables. One advantage of this bridge is that it is anchoring in granite rock instead of a river shore. The anchorage was 100 2" pipes. Each pipe was 3' long and half of the pipe was set into the rock. 21 wires were wrapped around the other half. When they strung new cables during the 1983-4 rehab, they preserved an example of the old cable and anchorage. And Eric caught that detail.
Eric Sakowski Photo via Highest Bridges [This web page has a lot of photos of the bridge, and I highly recommend accessing it.]

The rehab made the anchorages a very visible aspect of the bridge.
2019 Nick Schmiedeler Photo via BridgeHunter, cropped

1994 Geoff Hubbs Photo via BridgeHunter, cropped, License: Released into public domain

The tourist attraction included an incline railroad that went down to...
Boston Public Library Flickr via Bridge Hunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

...a hanging bridge.
Thomas Wentzel post via Dennis DeBruler



Sunday, July 3, 2022

1962 Canal Lift and 1958,1988 James Allan Skyway Bridges at Burlington, ON

Skyway: (Historic Bridges; 3D Satellite)

Street View
 
Street View

BORIS RUGHAS, Aug 2021
 
1 of  16 photos posted by Bill Salton
Dredging flotilla leaving Hamilton Harbour with tugs Lac Vancouver, Whitby, and Robinson Bay.

BridgeHunter-skyway points out that the floor supports are trusses rather than the usual rolled or built-up I-beams. The channel span is 495' (151m).
Street View

The original crossing of the harbor canal was a swing bridge. "In 1922, this was replaced by a single leaf Strauss heel-trunnion type bascule. An interesting story about this bridge is that in 1931 the canal was widened, and to accommodate this, a second bascule bridge was added at the other side of the canal to form a double leaf bascule bridge. On April 29, 1952, the freighter W. E. Fitzgerald collided with and destroyed one of the spans, which led to the design and construction of the existing lift bridge....The lift bridge was the longest and heaviest in Canada when completed. The lift span weight when completed was 2,100 tons. The bridge was designed for a single railway track of the Hamilton-Northwestern railway as well as a two lane roadway. In 1982, the tracks were removed, and the roadway was widened. The current weight of the lift span is 2200 tons (2000 tonnes). The bridge has a vertical lift capacity of of 110 feet (33.5 meters)." [HistoricBridges-lift]

The concrete bridge was added in 1985 [dbpedia] which allowed the 1958 bridge to be rehabilitated without reducing the traffic flow and then doubling the traffic capacity when the rehabilitation was completed. It carries the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) that connects Toronto, CA, with Niagara Falls, Fort Erie and the USA. I noticed these two bridges about a week ago when I studied the Garden State Skyway.

Street View

This is the post that motivated this research. Historic Bridges considers the 1985 bridge to be ugly. I don't think all concrete bridges are ugly. 
Neil Pichora posted
Federal St. Laurent inbound to the harbor today.
 
1 of 3 photos posted by Neil Pichora

Video
"This was the first large-scale application of cast-in-place prestressed concrete segmental construction in Ontario." [And you thought I had an adjective heavy writing style.]

Once the main pier was built using cranes, two form travelers were used to cantilever from that pier.
Screenshot

Screenshot

Post-stress tensioning was used in several dimensions. This diagram shows the tendons used in the longitudinal dimension. If I caught an earlier statement in the video correctly, they had to wait 48 hours after the concrete was poured before they could do the posttensioning. I'm surprised that the concrete obtained enough strength in just 48 hours to handle the stress of the tendon's tension. This additional 48 hours per each pair of segments explains why construction techniques quickly evolved from cast-in-place to lifting precast segments into place.
Screenshot

Screenshot

Screenshot


Saturday, July 2, 2022

1911 BNSF Twin Crossing Bridges over Deschutes River and Tunnel

From north to south:
Bridge #2: (Bridge HunterSatellite)
Bridge #1: (Bridge HunterSatellite)

This route was Oregon Trunk Railway (OTR) and Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway (SPS), and it is now BNSF and UP.

Looking South along bridge #2.
Steven J. Brown posted
Southern Pacific 4449 crossing the Deschutes River over Twin Bridge #2 on a blazing hot day in Wasco County, Oregon - June 24, 2017.

Looking North on #2.
BridgeHunter-#2, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA)

This must be bridge #1 because it is straight.
BridgeHunter-tunnel

Bridge #1
Photo from Imperial River Co. via BridgeHunter-#1 and RideWithGPS, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA)

1962 Sherars Bridge Quad @ 1:24,000


Friday, July 1, 2022

1963 I-75+I-71 Brent Spence Bridge over Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH

(Bridge Hunter; Historic Bridges; B&T; Satellite)

This is another bridge that was designed by the engineering firm Modjeski and Masters.

Street View, Apr 2019
 
The upper deck has yet to be completed.
1963 view via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA)

WCPO via BridgeHunter, License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike (CC BY-SA)

"Starting on March 1, 2021, the Brent Spence Bridge underwent a routine maintenance project to clean and paint the superstructure, which was completed ahead of schedule on November 15." [B&T]
Street View, Sep 2021

BrentSpenceBridgeCorridor
The bridge was designed to carry 80-100,000 vehicles per day. It currently carries twice that volume.
The bridge was reconfigured in 1985 to provide an additional travel lane on each deck.
--  Before: three 12-feet lanes + approximately five-feet shoulders
--  Now: four 11-feet lanes + one-foot shoulders

The plan is to implement the preferred alternative that was picked in 2012. The new bridge would be built immediately west of the current bridge. The problem is that it seems that every year they just crank out another report that says we should design and build the bridge ([BrentSpenceBridgeCorridor-documents]), but then nothing happens. I by no means looked at every document, but I did find this in the 2020 documents.
TrafficAndConceptAnalysis, p17

Please click Sherman's link and scroll down for some details about the tortured history concerning the capacity improvement plans.
1 of 3 photos posted by Bridges & Tunnels with Sherman Cahal
The Brent Spence Bridge is looking better than ever after a routine painting and maintenance project was completed last year. This double-deck crossing carries Interstates 71 and 75 across the Ohio River between Covington, Kentucky, and Cincinnati, Ohio.
➵ Check out more photos and history of the Brent Spence Bridge at http://bridgestunnels.com/location/brent-spence-bridge/

I skipped to the chase concerning the documents and found:
2022 Report, p16

So after decades of consuming taxpayer's money for planning, they still don't have an Interstate Cooperative Agreement written.


Thursday, June 30, 2022

1879+1908 (BNSF+Amtrak)/Santa Fe Raton Pass Tunnel

East Portal: (Satellite, just south of the NM-CO border)
West Portal: (Bridge HunterSatellite)

"Built 1879; second tunnel built 1908; original bore closed 1953." [BridgeHunter] It is the highest point on the Sante Fe at 7588' [UncoverColorado]

The Santa Fe and Denver & Rio Grande Western not only fought for the route through the Royal Gorge, they fought for this pass from Colorado to New Mexico. This was the Santa Fe's original route to California. But it has grades as high as 4% in Colorado. Santa Fe completed the 200+ mile Belen Cutoff in 1907, which has easier grades and is more direct. The now closed 1879 tunnel was 2,041' long. The 1908 bore was 2,787' with an approach grade of 0.158% instead of the 1.9% grade for the original bore. [american-rails] Since BNSF has moved its through freight operations to the cutoff, it doesn't want to maintain this route for passenger speeds. But, of course, Amtrak does want BNSF to maintain it. That is why I added the Amtrak label to these notes.

East Portal:
Marty Bernard posted
Raton Tunnel East Portal, Cab View
ATSF's Raton tunnel through Raton Pass, east portal, taken from cab of F7 309L pulling Train #23, the 𝘎𝘳𝘒𝘯π˜₯ 𝘊𝘒𝘯𝘺𝘰𝘯 near Wooten, Colorado (Colorado State Line marker) on August 19, 1967. Roger Puta photograph
Erich Houchens: I worked the Raton Desk (DS18) for five years 2012 to 2017. Still kicking myself for not taking a Road Trip and riding the headend of A3 and A4 over the pass. Of course the FRA rule against using cameras/cell phones on the headend would have prevented me from getting the same picture.

West Portal:
Hinge of fate, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Back when the original bore was still being used.
1929 CarterMuseum, Public Domain

american-rails
An A-B-B-A set of Santa Fe F3's have the "Super Chief" on Raton Pass in a publicity photo dated September 7, 1959. Roger Plummer photo.






Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Broadway Street Bridges over Milwaukee River in Milwaukee, WI

1982: (Bridge Hunter; Satellite)

This bridge was raised 3,073 times in 2017. [UrbanMilwaukee]
 
Street View

2:23 video @ 0:29 via Bing Owens share

Postcard via BridgeHunter-old

Broadway Street now appears to be a parking lot and Catalano Square blocks its connection with the bridge.
Satellite

2010 J.R. Manning Photo via BridgeHunter-1982
East Elevation as seen from the north approach span to the C&NW Swing Bridge. In the distance, on the left edge of the photo, is the Menomonee River Swing Bridge.

"If you feel like you’re getting stuck more often waiting for a bridge to come down to cross the river, you’re right. In 2014, the city’s 21 movable bridges were raised 14,003 times to accommodate boat traffic. In 2017, that number had climbed — by 60 percent! — to 23,244 openings. The increase is due to a confluence of factors including higher Lake Michigan water levels, a strong economy and a growing number of waterfront businesses. The river level is up two feet since 2014, causing an increasing number of boats to require bridge openings to navigate the rivers." [UrbanMilwaukee] I noticed in the above video that the bridge kept going up long after the boat had passed underneath. That delays traffic even more.