Sunday, November 3, 2019

New Champlain Bridge over St. Lawrence River at Montreal, QC

These notes concentrate on the building of the new bridge with emphasis on the cranes used to build it. See Champlian Bridges for general information on the old and new bridges at Montreal, QC. The Manitowoc M1200R notes have more images of the 900- and 1433- ton M1200R cranes working on this bridge. At the end of these notes are some videos that show the progress of the construction.

Pierre Lacoste posted
Lousy pic, sorry. It's a phone shot, couldn't get any closer. The last of the 4 MLC 650s on this bridge job. It's being dismantled this week. Only a lone 16000 remains, being kept around for loading stuff onto barges and trucks, wrapping up the job. There were 15 large (2250+) crawlers on this job at its busiest phase.
Pierre Lacoste As an update, this crane had the boom down and a Grove tele was handling the boom foot section with the hoist drum on it, so I assumed it was on its way out, but they've re-rigged it differently and moved it somewhat farther away, but looks like it's still going to be around for a bit yet.
Andre Mylocopos commented on Pierre's post
900 ton from Alberici USA

Andre Mylocopos commented on Pierre's post
1433 ton from Samsung Korea
[My understanding is that this is a Manitowoc M1200R 60' ringer built in Manitowoc, WI. It was probably purchased from Samsung who was the previous user of the crane.]

Andre Mylocopos commented on Pierre's post

Andre Mylocopos commented on Pierre's post

Pierre Lacoste posted
A new MLC 650, one of four onsite, begins work on a new bridge across the St Lawrence river in Montreal, Canada. Two were bought new by the contractor consortium, one was from Guay cranes and another from Lomma in N.J. The contractor's machines were purchased in a deal whereby Manitowoc supplied all the cranes for the job, some new, others used, including Grove RTs. At its height, the project featured 15 heavy lift crawlers (2250 and up), all Manitowoc, plus a bunch of subcontractor machines.

Pierre Lacoste posted
Another view of the MLC, on its nice new mats...which, over the 3 or so years the crane was onsite, gradually sank into the crushed stone jetty so as to be flush with the surrounding surface. These two contractor's cranes had all the options, VPC extender, luffer, auxilliary genset, the whole deal. In the background is the old bridge, soon to be demolished.

Jay Smooth Lopez commented on Pierre's post
Brandon Storie Pretty sure that's the main line drum. Big block uses 2 drums.

Brandon Storie commented on Pierre's post


Pierre Lacoste posted
This project also included a couple of barge-mounted M-1200s, one a 72-A, the other with the 75 boom, 1430 and 900 tons respectively, though as far as I could tell from a distance, the 72 was not fully configured for full capacity, they seemed to have left out some c-weights, an extra Ringer engine and presumably, the extra swing motors. Both used the same block; I'm guessing the 75 was fully configured for max capacity. The 72 (blue boom) was brought in from India, apparently. The other cranes are a barged MLC-300 with VPC/mast and two 16000s, one an ex Bigge unit.
Riley Anderson Nice picture. The M1200’s are some really rare machines to see.
Andre Mylocopos The M1200-1433 ton was from Korea, purchased from Samsung.
Pierre Lacoste Someone on site told me from India, but there you go. The 900-ton, when it was first brought in, had the Alberici logo on the Ringer boom-mast carrier, but there was no ID on the 72-A. Funny thing about the 72, on a webpage, an ad for it had it as sold, but there seems to be pieces of it still warehoused on a lot near Drummondville just off A-20. Going by the parts list in the ad, this crane had a plausibly Indian color scheme, including (faded) Mani red, dark green, blue, white and...pink. I thought maybe the "pink" might in fact be faded red, but then I saw the parts in question and they really are pink. Asians have different tastes in livery...either that or the crane was cobbled together from different components, or repainted partially many times. But pink?!
Andre Mylocopos The original owner had the different boom kits painted in different colors for parts management. They also had a front end for the 2250 as a crawler as well as a Maxer counterweight wagon which we didn’t buy. I believe it was 140 or so truck loads to the port albeit with smaller semis than we use here.


Pierre Lacoste posted
The 650 again. On the left, crosswise bridge sections are being added, cantilevered from a central tower with cable suspension. Each section weighs 850 tons and they cantilevered 13 sections in this way, across the seaway below. Do the math, and that's not counting the 3 strand jack derricks (blue structures on the span) that lifted and placed each crosswise section. Three sets of strand jacks were required to lift, shuttle the span sections to the end and then lift again/place the sections for assembly.
Pierre Lacoste In the foreground is the old bridge being replaced. Demolition begins next year, it's about to fall into the river.

Danny Fortier commented on Pierre's post

Pierre Lacoste posted
A more typical type of construction, laying box-section beams lengthwise onto piers, using two M-1200 ringers, the 900-ton 75A and 1430-ton 72-A. This was the only tandem pick I saw; the others were performed by a single crane. Maybe the wind that day required a second hook just to keep the load from turning on the block; it certainly wasn't excess weight or radius. It gets pretty windy in the middle of the river and the long box-section beams probably make a good sail...
Andre Mylocopos This may be the only tandem-pick by two M-1200’s ever and almost certainly the only one for two barge-mounted M-1200’s!

Jim Browne commented on Pierre's post

Pierre Lacoste posted
This shot gives a clearer idea of how far out the span is cantilevered. On the pier-based part, the box-section spans were installed lengthwise, by the two M-1200 ringers on barges; the Seaway and south shore work was handled mainly by the 4 MLC 650s. You can't tell in this pic, but the blue gantry thing (Dorman & Long) is one of three and VERY stoutly built. They were pre-assembled on the ground and lifted in one piece by the MLC 650s, on the luffer. That's a lot of iron on a luffer.

Pierre Lacoste posted
This is what was counter-balancing all that cantilevered weight: earlier on, here the main tower has begun to rise and the temporary support structures are supporting the bridge span construction on the opposite side of the tower. Those gray "outrigger" structures are part of the whole set-up to build out the suspended bridge over the Seaway. On the ground, assembly of the Dorman-Long strand jack traveling gantries has begun (the blue stuff in the foreground). Cranes: 2 MLC 650 w/luffer, 16000, MLC 300 with super tall luffer, brought in mostly to set up a Comansa tower which would continue building the cable-supporting tower.
Pierre Lacoste The temporary support trestles rest on concrete caps over drilled piles...lots of them. I went through here today and they are presently demolishing these temporary foundations. We've been using the new bridge for a couple of months now, give or take.

Pierre Lacoste posted
Got 650s if ya want 'em...

Three of the four onsite are visible here, at an earlier stage of the work. The fourth was working roughly behind where I was standing taking this pic.
Ben Stalvey Impressive wow who owns these MLC 650s?
Pierre Lacoste Two were purchased by the contracting consortium for this job, one was from Lomma in New Jersey and one from Guay cranes here in Montreal, Canada.
Ben Stalvey wow Lomma that is a ways from home
Ben Stalvey Guay they don't have many Manitowocs really. Neat
Pierre Lacoste The first two 650s came onsite in early 2016. Guay seems to be adding more 'towocs as time goes by, they have some 16000s, a new MLC 300, some 2250s. That and some Demags. They seem to like Groves in the 250-350-ton class and Demags and now Liebherrs in the 500-600-ton class teles. They have the big,big Liebherr tele, what is it, the 1200-ton job. That came on this bridge gig for a couple of weeks.
Pierre Lacoste Ben Stalvey And plenty of barges from Weeks Marine in NYC...or NJ.

Pierre Lacoste posted
MLC 650 working on assembly of ALE A-frame support system. This bridge is going over the St-Lawrence Seaway, without interrupting shipping traffic at all.
Pierre Lacoste That's another of the 650s, half-hidden behind. On the closer one, the VPC is out; there's a fair bit of stick and luffer there.

Pierre Lacoste posted
The bridge is a cable suspension job over the Seaway, but the remainder over the river is a pier and span type.

Pierre Lacoste posted
Last one for tonight...same subject, different viewpoint.

Pierre Lacoste posted
16000 with Maxer wagon/mast setup pre-assembling 850-ton bridge span sections on the ground, to be lifted to bridge level...not the green bridge in the foreground, but its replacement behind. The white shelter is "telescopic" and can be extended to twice its length to protect workers once the lifting is done.

Pierre Lacoste posted
The same 16000, from another angle. It was difficult to take a proper pic, too many obstacles in the way. In the background, the 1430-ton M-1200-72 on a barge.

Pierre Lacoste posted
MLC 650 lifting one of three Dorman-Long strand jack gantires that lifted and placed the previously-mentioned 850-ton bridge span components. Looking at the one already up on the middle span, you can see that these things are very ruggedly built...they ain't light, that's for sure. They were assembled below and picked by the 650 in one piece, on the luffer.

Pierre Lacoste posted
M-1200-72 ringer, (left), M-1200-75 ringer placing bridge beams, ex-Bigge blue/white 16000.

Pierre Locoste posted
The same two cranes and on the left [I think he means the right], Guay's MLC-300 with VPC and mast plus plenty of stick, on a barge.
Bob Brickman About 300’ on the far crane.

Pierre Lacoste posted
MLC 650 with luffer down for a very windy long weekend. VPC is out pretty far back. Background: straight-boom MLC 650, M-1200-75 in distance, on a barge.
Matthew Hunter commented on Pierre's post
Pierre Lacoste Pic taken from the south shore end. At one point, 3 of the 650s were on this jetty. Two are seen here, with a third (w/luffer) barely visible in the distance. One of Guay's bigger teles is on the left (Liebherr, probably) and jutting out over the bridge beams, top left, a 16000 w/wind tip. Good pic, it really puts the size of the 650 in perspective.
Bryan Young Matthew Hunter were was this and is this union?
Matthew Hunter Bryan Young yes it is Local 711. Montreal, Quebec. Canada
Matthew Hunter commented on Pierre's post

Andre Mylocopos commented on a post
Both of these M1200’s are M250 based. Left is 1433 ton, right 900 ton. Apparently only 8 were ever built .
Riley Anderson Andre Mylocopos the one on the left is for sale, and is actually the reason for this post lol
Ben Stalvey So the one on the left would have been one of the original Walter Wright M1200 Ringers then.
Andre Mylocopos I don’t know who Walter Wright is but that M1200 was spec’d by Samsung in Korea and shipped directly from the factory via Seattle if I recall. They ticked every option box!
Andre Mylocopos Big one was 210x62 + 45x160 sectionals on either side so roughly 180 x 150 x 10 because water depth was as little 8-9 feet. The smaller one was 190x62 + sectionals.
Riley Anderson Andre Mylocopos I can believe they checked every option, the spec sheet that’s with the sale info says it comes with M250, M1200 ringer, Maxer225/400,
All of the ringer boom, all of the 44main boom, all the 132 fixed jib, all the ringer fixed jib, plus any hook block you could imagine and lots of other stuff.
Rocky Rutherford Riley Anderson I hope we’re not going in the ringer business lol
Riley Anderson Rocky Rutherford well if you look at the picture above, the green boom ringer is for sale with crane, ringer, jib, all kinds of good stuff. Just curious if the ringer would work on a newer crane....

Andre Mylocopos posted three photos with the comment: "A few M1200 pics I forgot I had. The multicoloured unit is the 1433 ton. You can see the 882 ton in the rear."
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Andre Mylocopos posted four photos with the comment: "Drone pics of Champlain Bridge construction in Montreal with great shots of the M1200’s and a few others! For the sense of scale, the multicat measures 21 x 56 and the tug is 11 x 40.
Note: Left (blue) M1200 - 1433 ton and right (red) M1200 - 882 ton"
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Looking at the water at the piers in these videos, it appears that the river has a strong flow. And I bet that river is no stranger to ice.
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(new window)  He caught a segment being raised to the cable stay deck in this one.


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