Friday, April 28, 2017

MWRD: Building the Sanitary and Ship Canal pioneered new technologies

I've read that much of the technology developed to build this canal such as steam-powered shovels was then used to dig the Panama Canal.

MWRD posted
Historical photo of the week: Construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at an unknown location in the mid-1890s, showing one of the cantilever incline machines that were used to move broken rock from the excavation areas to the spoil piles
Jeff Bransky It says section 10 on the photo. I noticed that that large conveyor structure is sitting on rails so it can be moved as work progresses. Interesting to see horses at work in the background. I imagine the machine was driven by a steam engine.
Eugene Klichowski Section 10 was between Summit and Willow Springs
I thought the above was a conveyor belt where this end would be lowered into the canal so men could dump debris on it. But the following indicates it is for removing big rocks.

MWRD posted
Construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at an unknown location in the mid-1890s, showing one of the cantilever incline machines that were used to move broken rock from the excavation areas to the spoil piles. 

MWRD posted
Spoil piles along the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) east of Harlem Avenue on June 28, 1899. Excavated material was piled along the banks of the CSSC during its construction in the 1890s, where much of it remained for years.
They should have left them do we would have “hills” on the prairie.
They did leave them for many years up in North Park along the North Shore Channel. The neighborhood loved them.

MWRD posted
xcavation for the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) on July 16, 1894. The 28-mile CSSC, from Damen Avenue in Chicago to north of 9th Street in Lockport, was built between 1892 and 1900. The MWRD extended the CSSC another four miles and built the Lockport Powerhouse and Lock from 1903 until 1907.

MWRD posted
Workers loading rock for removal during excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in September 1894.
Kevin Murphy looks like the Lemont area with stone

MWRD posted

MWRD posted
Skaters on ice in the bottom of the nearly complete Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal west of Kedzie Avenue in Chicago, Illinois, on December 30, 1899. The Kedzie Avenue Bridge is in the background and behind it is the Chicago, Madison and Northern Railroad Bridge.

Greg Burnet shared
Don't you mean the CM&N RR bridge is on this side of the Kedzie bridge, if this pic is looking SW?.....and did the old Kedzie bridge swing open from a mid water base?...looking at Google Maps now, there is an abandoned RR bridge farther past these two...does anybody know what RR it was for?
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Paul Musselman
 This view has to be looking Northeast since it states that the skaters are West of Kedzie.
This 1938 photo shows the city replaced the swing bridge with its preferred trunnion bascule design because the MWRD bridge became way too narrow.
The abandoned bridge is the Santa Fe/Illinois Northern bridge.
This bridge was part of GTW's original route into Chicago. After the GTW built east to connect with the C&WI, Santa Fe took over the Corwith Yard. At one time International Harvester owned the Illinois Northern because it served the huge plant they used to have north of the canal.
There used to be a lot more industry along this railroad including some industries that were east of Western Avenue.
much of the debris generated by that dig went into Grant Park fill.
So did rubble from the Chicago fire.
Robin Rosenberg
 The Fire rubble filled the area known as Lake Park which didn't go past the IC tracks.
And you know this how?
 
Dennis DeBruler commented on Robin Rosenburg's "And you know this how?" comment.
By the dates on some photos. Here is an 1865 photo showing Lake Park posted by JoAnne Gazarek Bloom


Dennis DeBruler commented on Robin Rosenburg's "And you know this how?" comment.
This 1866 photo posted by David Daruska shows Lake Park is filled in, but there are just piers east of the IC tracks.
Of course, the fire happened in 1871 and the canal was dug after 1890.



MWRD posted
 Today's image shows excavation for the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Romeoville, Illinois, on September 25, 1894, specifically “1 3/4 tons of rock in mid air” being dumped onto a pile from a hopper. The 28-mile CSSC, from Damen Ave in Chicago to just north of 9th St in Lockport, was built between 1892 and 1900. The MWRD extended the CSSC another four miles and built the Lockport Powerhouse and Lock from 1903 until 1907. 
 
MWRD posted
A concrete mixer and wall construction for the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) extension in Lockport, Illinois, between 9th and 16th Streets on June 9, 1906. Between 1903 and 1907, the Sanitary District of Chicago (now MWRD) extended the CSSC and built the Lockport Powerhouse and Lock in order to generate hydroelectric power and to allow passage of watercraft between the Des Plaines River and the CSSC.

MWRD posted
This cyanotype image was taken during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Shipping Canal in the mid-1890s and shows workers drilling holes for dynamite while excavated rock is moved up an an incline track in the background.
 
MWRD posted
Dynamite was used to blast through bedrock in a 14 mile stretch between Willow Springs and Lockport, Illinois, during the construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Pictured here on June 28, 1899, is a 4450 pound supply.

Here is how they got the sidewalls so straight.
MWRD posted
Historical Photo of the Week: Workers pause for a photo with a channeling machine during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Romeoville on September 25, 1894. Channeling machines were used to make smooth, vertical “wall” cuts on each side of the canal and then the rock between the walls was drilled, blasted and removed. 

MWRD posted
Workers pause for a photo with a channeling machine during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in 1894. Channeling machines were used to make smooth vertical “wall” cuts on each side of the canal and then the rock between was drilled and blasted for removal.

MWRD posted
Operators test out a steam powered trench excavator during excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal on November 16, 1898.

MWRD posted
Various people and workers pose near a hydraulic dredge during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in this cyanotype image from the mid-1890s (note the dog in the wheelbarrow).
John Lovaas I gotta say, this is the first time I've ever seen cyanotype used for an archival/documentary photograph- fascinating! Does the District have more of these?
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago Not many. This cyanotype print shows a group of workers, visitors and staff posing for a photo during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in the late 1890s.
MWRD posted
Excavation for the Chicago Sanitary Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois, in the mid-1890s.
 
MWRD
Workers loading rock onto hoppers during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in an area northeast of Lemont on September 20, 1894. Approximately 43 million cubic yards of material were excavated during the construction of the canal, and at the time, it was the largest ever public works excavation project.

MWRD posted the following photos as part of a long write up concerning their 129 year history. They built the main canal in just a couple of years after it was formed, so the districts has branched out into many other projects such as treating the sewage in the 1920s and allowing rain to sink into the ground rather than runoff to the sewers (grass play grounds for schools, green alleys, rain barrels, etc.) in the 21st Century.
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Historical Photos: Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in 1895 and after completion in 1904, followed by the North Shore Channel under construction in 1906 and the Cal-Sag Channel in 1914; Board of Trustees meeting July 25, 1894; testing water quality; workers posing with equipment. Modern day: Kayakers on the main branch of the Chicago River, phosphorus recovered from the water treatment process, Stage 1 of McCook Reservoir, and a green alley in Berwyn.

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A dynamite blast during construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal on May 22, 1895.

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MWRD posted
Excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal extension south of the Lockport Powerhouse on June 11, 1906.

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The Cal Sag Channel under construction on Oct. 5, 1914

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Sanitary District (now called the MWRD) Board of Trustees on July 25, 1894.

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A District worker tests water quality on May 26, 1923.

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Three laborers posing next to a compressed air rock drill during the construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship canal. The nearly completed sluice gates for the Lockport Controlling Works can be seen in the background. The estimated date is sometime in November 1896. Drilling into rock requires the use of a fluid, or drilling mud, which can be seen splattered all over the workers. Explosives were placed into the holes and detonated, and the rock debris could then be removed from the worksite.

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Present day: Kayakers on the main branch of the#ChicagoRiver Friends of the Chicago River

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Phosphorus removed from the water treatment process at the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant in Cicero, IL.

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McCook Reservoir Stage 1 was completed in December 2017.

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A green alley in Berwyn.
[They are referring to using bricks to create a permeable surface. But notice all of the green recycle bins to keep plastic, etc. out of the landfills. And the brown bag on the left is probably for yard waste so that it can be composed instead of going to the landfill.]
 
MWRD posted
This cyanotype image shows a steam shovel loading hopper cars during excavation for the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in the mid-1890s.

MWRD posted
A steam shovel loads dump cars near Joliet on February 28, 1906, during excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal extension south of the Lockport Powerhouse.
MWRD posted
Excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal extension south of the Lockport Powerhouse in Lockport, Illinois, on October 25, 1905.

MWRD
Excavation of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal on July 3, 1894. 

MWRD posted
Large piles of rock spoil along the banks of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal during excavation in an unknown location in the mid-1890s.

MWRD posted on Feb 28, 2021
Today’s historical photo is a cyanotype image taken near Lemont in the mid-1890s and shows a man carrying a bundle of straw with the under-construction Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal visible in the background. Learn more about the Chicago Area Waterway System here ⬇️


I include these photo because of the view of the tailings mound. Bill Molony posted two photos with the comment:
These two photographs from our collection are of a very violent head-on collision that took place in the 1890's on the Santa Fe Railway in the vicinity of Lemont and Romeo.
In the background can be seen the mounds of tailings from the excavation of the Sanitary & Ship Canal that was under construction at that time.
The Santa Fe was still single-tracked in this area at the time of this collision, and wasn't double-tracked until about 1910 or so.
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Photo of grain elevators on the north side of the Main Stem


In Sept 2020, I got hit with a Double Doomsday. Both Facebook and Google changed their software. I said "changed" instead of "updated" because the new software is not better. In fact, Google's Blogger software is far worse except for a search function that works. For example, it has three bugs concerning photos and their captions. So I'm no longer copying photos and interesting comments from Facebook. I'm just saving the link. Unfortunately, some of the links are to private groups.


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