Monday, February 22, 2016

State Street Bridges

(Bridge HunterHistoric Bridges, Chicago Loop, Street View from Wabash River Bridge)

(Update: this has been rewritten to sort the photos by bridge. The original version is here.)

There were five bridges at this site

1865-1871 Wood Swing Bridge

Boffie Fischer Kelly posted
I found this picture online in 2011. I don't have much information on it other than it was Chicago about 1870. I know it is a little later than this group is targeting but I thought it was a neat picture.
Bobbie Fischer Kelly So by the article above [Historic Bridges], the picture I posted was built in 1864 and destroyed by fire in 1871.
[Note the grain elevators where the Kraft Plant, Sun-Times and Trump buildings were located.]

William Shapotkin posted two photos with the comment: "Bridge over untroubled waters -- here are two pix of the opening of the rebuilt State St bridge over the Chicago River. View of open bridge looks N/W. View of closed bridge looks N/E. These two pix were taken May 28, 1949. Earl Clark Collection."
Dennis DeBruler Back when there was still some industry north of the river. The building on the right with the Coca-Cola advertising was a Kraft plant. (https://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/.../waker-drive...) I don't know what the white building on the left was.
Richard Pitchford posted
Looking north across the State St. bridge, 1870/now, Chicago
[The arch truss 1870 swing bridge reminds me of the old Rush Street Bridge.]

1872-1887 Iron Swing Bridge

No photos

1887-1901 Steel Swing Bridge

The steel swing bridge that had just been removed from here is similar to the Dearborn Bridge in the background.

MWRD posted
Demolition of the south abutment of the State Street bridge on the Chicago River on January 14, 1902.

I don't think this is a State Street Bridge. The trusses are too flat and low for the swing bridges.
Sheila Kirby posted
Crossing the State Street Bridge 
1893 Chicago by Jay Birlic
[This would be a predecessor swing bridge. How do we determine if we are looking south or north?]
ChicagoLoopBridges also posted this photo with the comment:
The State St bridge seen in this photo was a swing bridge and replaced a similar bridge destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. There has been a bridge in this location since 1864.

1903-1939 Scherzer Rolling Lift

Ron Schultz shared
Historic Chicago posted
Chicago - State Street Bridge (1905)
David Read The ship is the Pere Marquette 18, a car ferry working out of Ludington MI temporarily as a tour boat during the summer of 1910. Supposedly, this photo was taken on Labor Day 1910 just at the end of its season. A few days later, the PM 18 sank in Lake Michigan taking 29 crew and passengers. Some speculate the boat hit a dock hard during the touring season and broke a seam above water line. When fully loaded with railway cars a few days later, the seam was pushed below waterline causing the ship to sink near Sheboygan. The wreck has not been found yet.
Betty N Bruce Burkhardt Something wrong the state street bridge was not built until 1949 .
Dennis DeBruler This would have been the third bridge at this location. It was a Scherzer rolling-lift bridge that was here from 1903-1939. [Patrick McBriarty, <and I included the post link below>]

Patrick McBriarty posted
The 3rd State Street Bridge (1903-1939) was a Scherzer rolling-lift design. This postcard image is from 1909 courtesy of Jeff Baker.

MWRD posted
The south cofferdam during construction of a bridge at State Street on the Chicago River on June 17, 1902. This bridge would be completed in 1903 and would be later replaced by the current bridge in 1949.

MWRD posted two photos with the comment:
Historical photos: A view to the north from the Chicago River showing construction of a bridge at State Street on June 2, 1902. The bridge was completed in 1903 and replaced with the current bridge in 1949. We also provided a close up view of the Wizard of Oz advertisement.
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2

MWRD posted
A view to the north towards the State Street bridge over the Chicago River in Chicago on May 14, 1903.
MWRD posted
Historical photo of the week: Boats and bridges on the Chicago River on July 2, 1910, looking west towards the lifted State St and Dearborn St bridges, which were both built by the Sanitary District of Chicago (now MWRD).

MWRD posted
A northeasterly view of the State Street Bridge over the Chicago River on March 1, 1903.
Dennis DeBruler I knew C&NW had a State Street Yard along the river, but I did not know they used to have a grain elevator here.
http://clearinghouse.isgs.illinois.edu/.../0bwq08007.jpg


Christine Prairie commented on MWRD's post

Glen Miller posted
The State Street bridge opens to let a boat pass in 1913

Ron Schultz shared

Patrick McBriarty posted
The 3rd State Street Bridge (1903-1939) was a Scherzer rolling-lift design. This postcard image is from 1909 courtesy of Jeff Baker.

MWRD posted
A northeasterly view of the flooded south cofferdam for construction of the State Street Bridge over the Chicago River on April 14, 1902. The cofferdam was flooded due to an overnight leak and resulted in a two-week delay of work. The bridge was completed in 1903 and was replaced by the current, existing bridge in 1949.
[This is almost a couple of decades before the Wrigley Building was built. The Rush Street Bridge is in the background. Is that the Kraft Plant just beyond the grain elevator?]

BDBRCPC posted
Chicago River at State Street - 1902
Raymond Kunst shared

MWRD posted two photos with the comment:
Historical photos: A view to the north from the Chicago River showing construction of a bridge at State Street on June 2, 1902. The bridge was completed in 1903 and replaced with the current bridge in 1949. We also provided a close up view of the Wizard of Oz advertisement.
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2

1949 Chicago Trunnion Bascule

Street View

William Shapotkin posted two photos with the comment: "Bridge over untroubled waters -- here are two pix of the opening of the rebuilt State St bridge over the Chicago River. View of open bridge looks N/W. View of closed bridge looks N/E. These two pix were taken May 28, 1949. Earl Clark Collection."
Dennis DeBruler Back when there was still some industry north of the river. The building on the right with the Coca-Cola advertising was a Kraft plant. (https://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/.../waker-drive...) I don't know what the white building on the left was.
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Chet Lunsford commented on Richard's post
Charles Cushman's photo of the current bridge during construction, "Sep. 26, 1948. New State St. bridge and Lincoln Tower"
[Lincoln Tower??? That is where the Wrigley Building should be.]

Rob DeLand posted
New State St. bridge, Sep. 14, 1948 (Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection, Indiana University Archives)
Sheila Mcsurley posted
Chicago River 1973

William Shapotkin posted two photos with the comment: "Bridge over untroubled waters -- here are two pix of the opening of the rebuilt State St bridge over the Chicago River. View of open bridge looks N/W. View of closed bridge looks N/E. These two pix were taken May 28, 1949. Earl Clark Collection."
Dennis DeBruler Back when there was still some industry north of the river. The building on the right with the Coca-Cola advertising was a Kraft plant. (https://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/.../waker-drive...) I don't know what the white building on the left was.

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Raymond Kunst posted
Bataan-Corregidor Memorial Bridge (State Street Bridge) — Contractor: Overland Construction Company of Chicago, Illinois (1949).
The crossing at North State Street is one of the longest continuous crossings (more than 176 years). The first crossing, a ferry, was established in the 1830's. The first bridge, an iron reinforced wooden swing bridge, was built in 1864. The Great Fire of 1871 destroyed the bridge, and a new swing bridge was opened in 1872.
A Scherzer rolling lift bascule bridge was built here in 1903. The 1903 bridge was in service until 1939 when the subway tunnels (Red Line) were started. Construction of the current bridge was delayed by subway construction and material shortages in WW II.
Photo taken from the LondonHouse rooftop.
[That is the Wabash Street Bridge in the foreground.]
Raymond Kunst shared

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