Saturday, January 30, 2016

MWRD: Interceptor Sewer Construction

The first subheading below was the title of these notes. I'm generalizing these notes to include all of the interceptor sewer photos I have found. The photos have been moved here from three other posts.

14-18-foot Sewer Pipe being built in 1918


Raymond Kunst posted
Laying sewer pipes along Lawrence Ave, 1918, Chicago
I wonder if the trestle pilings we see on the side of the trench were driven all along both sides. Specifically, is that what is keeping the mud walls with buildings on top of them from collapsing? They have a conveyor belt that carries debris from the dig in front of the pipe back to fill over the pipe that is built. This method of laying pipe is called "cut and fill." That conveyor is on rails so that it can be moved forward as the dig progresses.

The comments indicate the scaffolding in the middle is to allow workers to construct a brick arch for the top of the pipe.

Michael Pazanin Looks like there lined with Brick , at that time there where more bricklayers then all the other trades tougher!!!

No wonder I keep finding brick plants in various towns. Illinois is lucky that it sits on top of sedimentary rock that has a lot of  outcroppings of coal, sand and clay.

Fernando Flores A few years ago, I saw them working on this tunnel at Lawrence between Linder and Cicero, and you could see the bricks layout clearly. It was fascinating!


Beer drinking, bicycle riding, Chicago photography club posted
Eric A Lussenhop Being a Local 130 Plumber here in Chicago and with all my safety training......
I can't imagine opening a hole that deep and that close to buildings with out massive amounts of shoring
Look at the train running on the tracks parallel to the ditch on theft
Raymond Kunst shared
Laying sewer pipes along Lawrence Ave and Broadway, 1918, Chicago.
William D Brown no shoring I wonder how many collapses they had.


1924 Sewer Construction


MWRD posted
Historical Photo of the Week: Sewer construction along Thatcher Ave in River Forest on July 8, 1924
What first caught my eye was that they were using a steam powered shovel as late as 1924. The cement mixer is powered by a gas engine. Note that they use a regular wheelbarrow on the right to dump the ingredients into the chute that will be lifted to feed the drum, but they use special wheelbarrows on the left to move the mixed concrete.

Seeing that mixer makes me wonder when ready mix trucks were developed. (Update: trucks became big enough and strong enough to carry concrete in the 1950s.)

20170713 0108

South Side Interceptor Sewers


MWRD posted
Historical Photo of the Week: The intersection of 92nd Street and Mackinaw Avenue in Chicago on October 3, 1923, showing a westward view of work on the Calumet intercepting sewer system.

MWRD posted
Construction of a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer in Chicago on September 28, 1922, looking north on Avenue N at 100th Street.

Marty Gatton shared

MWRD posted
Workers pause for a portrait during construction of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer in ‪#‎Chicago‬ on February 26, 1924.

MWRD posted
Workers pause for a photo during construction of a portion of the Southwest Intercepting Sewer on November 21, 1935.
MWRD posted
MWRD posted
Construction of a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer on September 28, 1922, looking north on Avenue N at 100th Street.

MWRD posted
Work on a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer System on April 26, 1923, looking to the northwest at the intersection of 106th Street and Avenue O in Chicago.

It is not worthy of its own post, but I wanted to record how the size of the interceptor sewers varied.
MWRD posted
Inside the Salt Creek 2 interceptor sewer on April 17, 1928.

MWRD posted
Construction of a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer System along Avenue N, looking south from 99th Street in Chicago, Illinois, on September 6, 1922.

MWRD posted
A western view of Calumet Intercepting Sewer System construction in an area near Woodlawn and 103rd Street in Chicago on November 20, 1916.

Dennis DeBruler shared
Rick Aylsworth It was hard to judge the scale of that until I noticed the men inside!
Bob Lalich The buildings in the background were Pullman Co at the time. They were later sold to EMD.

Dennis DeBruler commented on MWRD's post
Given the industrial buildings in the background, we must be looking West. The boxcars in the background are on the Pullman Railroad. Woodland won't be built for a few more decades.
1929 Calumet Lake Quadrangle @ 1:24,000

Compare this photo to the November 20 photo above.
MWRD posted
Calumet Sag Sewer System construction in an area near Woodlawn and 103rd Street in Chicago, Illinois, on October 24, 1916. 
Randy Ranes: Are they pumping concrete?
Dennis DeBruler: Randy Ranes It appears the close mixer is dumping into a chute whereas the far mixer is dumping onto a conveyor belt.
Top Fan
By comparing the angle to the EMD/Pullman buildings in the background, we can see the progress they made between Oct 24 and Nov 20.

MWRD posted
 Sewer construction on July 27, 1917, viewed looking west at the intersection of Houston Avenue and 97th Street in Chicago, Illinois.

MWRD posted
A view of work on a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer System along Avenue O near 107th Street in Chicago on May 17, 1923.

MWRD posted
Construction of a headhouse for the Calumet Intercepting Sewer System on June 13, 1923. This location is on the west bank of the Calumet River, near where the Chicago Skyway currently crosses the river. The headhouse, which is no longer there, was used for maintenance of the siphon that moves sewer flow under the Calumet River for the intercepting sewer which leads to the 95th Street Pumping Station.

MWRD posted
Construction of a section of the Calumet Intercepting Sewer on October 8, 1923, looking northeast towards the intersection of 92nd Street, Mackinaw Avenue and Harbor Avenue in Chicago. 

Mike Breski shared
OK who's tracks? Calumet Hotel in the background.
Bob Lalich: BRC and CRI&P each owned a track. Both tracks went to USS South Works, seen in the distance, and connected to the EJ&E.
Steve Malachinski: BRC tracks are on the left CRI&P on the right.
[US Steel South Works in the right background.]



North Side Interceptor Sewers


MWRD posted
A group poses for a portrait during construction of a section of the North Side Intercepting Sewer (section number 4) on September 11, 1925. North Side Intercepting Sewer Nos. 3 and 4 are the largest of the North Side intercepting sewers at 15 feet high, and they run along the North Shore Channel and McCormick Boulevard between Howard Street in Skokie and Argyle Street in Chicago.

MWRD posted
A completed section of intercepting sewer in an unknown location, with scaffolding below a manhole shaft and an electric locomotive with muck cars on September 11, 1928

MWRD posted
A view of the bottom of a drop shaft during construction of the North Side intercepting sewer on September 6, 1924

MWRD posted

Miscellaneous


MWRD posted
Today’s photo shows the surface area near a drop shaft for construction of an intercepting sewer March 8, 1928. The exact location is unknown. The MWRD owns and operates 560 miles of intercepting sewers, which are large sewers that receive flow from approximately 10,000 local municipal sewer system connections. The wastewater is then conveyed by the intercepting sewers to MWRD Water Reclamation Plants for treatment.

I think this is too small to be an interceptor sewer, but I wanted to record that horses & a wagon were being used as late as 1930.
MWRD posted
A view to the southwest at sewer construction on Lawrence Avenue, just east of Broadway, in front of the Sheridan Trust and Savings Bank Building (currently known as the Bridgeview Bank Building) in Chicago on August 9, 1930.
Dennis DeBruler: I'm surprised that horses and a wagon were being used as late as 1930.



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