Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Jackson Boulevard Bridge over the South Branch

HAER ILL, 16-CHIG, 126--2
Looking North
(Bridge Hunter, Historic Bridges, Chicago Loop BridgesSatellite)

The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District posted the Loop North link to recognize the 100th birthday of the January 29, 1916 bridge. It is a rather fascinating read.

It was one of two road bridges in the Loop designed by Joseph Strauss. The other was Lake Shore Drive. The article says he is better known as chief engineer on the Golden Gate Bridge. I also know him as the designer of railroad bridges. See the bridgeStrauss label in this blog.

The first three loop bridges built by the Sanitary District were "Scherzer rolling lift bridges at Randolph, Dearborn, and State Streets. The Jackson bridge is a trunnion bascule bridge – and of the 18 Loop bridges it is the sole surviving Sanitary District bridge."
Route 66 began at Jackson & Michigan in 1926, making the Jackson Boulevard Bridge the first bridge on the storied highway as it made its way westbound from Chicago. Jackson Boulevard was a two-way street until the mid-1950s when it became one-way eastbound. At that point, Adams Street was made the westbound portion of Route 66 out of the Loop.
(LoopNorth)

Since Adams Street bridge is going to be closed to road traffic for about 13 months, it will be interesting what will happen to the traffic pattern.

Update:
MWRD posted
A view from the Adams Street Bridge looking south at the South Branch of the Chicago River showing the new Jackson Street Bridge raised before opening to the public on January 29, 1916.

Ron Kolman commented on the MWRD post
Nice photo. Very cool CONCAVE building facade on right. Some electrical company sign is distance. Enlarged/sharpened/de-shadowed.
[I don't know what he means about a "concave building facade."]

MWRD posted
Historical Photo of the Week: The cofferdam on the west side of the South Branch of the ‪#‎Chicago‬ River during construction of the Jackson Blvd. bridge on April 2, 1914, viewed from the south side of the swing bridge that was being replaced.
MWRD posted
The cofferdam on the west side of the South Branch of the Chicago River during construction of the Jackson Boulevard Bridge in Chicago, Illinois, on April 2, 1914. The MWRD built the bascule bridge to replace the previous swing bridge. It was completed in late 1915 and was opened to traffic in January 1916.


MWRD posted
Historical photo of the week: Construction of the west abutment for the Jackson Boulevard bridge, viewed from the northwest corner looking south down the South Branch of the Chicago River, on February 19, 1915. The bascule style bridge was built by the Sanitary District (now MWRD) in 1915.
Dennis DeBruler The Scherzer rolling lift bridge of the Metropolitan West Elevated is in the background. The Chicago, Aurora & Elgin interurban also used that bridge.

That bridge and the Van Buren Street Bridge were the first two bridges built by Scherzer. He developed this design because there was not enough room between the two bridges for swing bridges. Once again, necessity is the mother of invention.

Chicago History Museum via DNAinfo
View of Jackson Boulevard Bridge looking south down the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois, 1916.

Pavel Bv posted
Former Jackson Street Swing Bridge, 1892. “Union Depot” rail yard on the front left.
MWRD posted
Vehicles and pedestrians wait to cross the South Branch of the Chicago River at the west side of the Jackson Boulevard bridge on April 1, 1916. The bascule style bridge was built by the Sanitary District (now MWRD) in 1915.

MWRD posted
The original Jackson Blvd. bridge from the west end looking east in 1914.

MWRD posted
Historical photo of the week: Construction of the west abutment for the Jackson Boulevard bridge, viewed from the northwest corner looking south down the South Branch of the Chicago River, on February 19, 1915. The bascule style bridge was built by the Sanitary District (now MWRD) in 1915.
Dennis DeBruler The Scherzer rolling lift bridge of the Metropolitan West Elevated is in the background. The Chicago, Aurora & Elgin interurban also used that bridge.

That bridge and the Van Buren Street Bridge were the first two bridges built by Scherzer. He developed this design because there was not enough room between the two bridges for swing bridges. Once again, necessity is the mother of invention.

MWRD posted
The original Jackson Blvd. bridge over the South Branch of the Chicago River, viewed from the west end looking east, in 1914.




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